Events

FOOD FINDERS TACKLES FOOD INSECURITY AND FOOD WASTE WITH ITS 2nd ANNUAL FARM TO TABLEAUX FUNDRAISER

Long Beach, CA – <9/12/23> – In its continued effort to combat food insecurity and food waste, Food Finders is hosting its 2nd annual Farm to Tableaux fundraiser. Currently, 1 in 4 people in Los Angeles County suffer from food insecurity, and despite the need, 38% of all food produced in the US goes uneaten or unsold.

“Food is a basic human right, yet far too many individuals and families suffer from chronic hunger and do not know where their next meal is coming from,” said Diana Lara, the Executive Director of Food Finders. “With millions of pounds of food discarded every year, we’re committed to rescuing that food and bringing it to people in need.”

The event will be a celebration of the art and culture of Frida Kahlo. Guests will enjoy a taste of Mexican cuisine and Mexican-inspired performances from local entertainers and artists. All proceeds will support Food Finders’ main food rescue program.

Last year’s event raised $168,000, which provided 1,848,000 meals to the communities Food Finders served. In 2022, Food Finders rescued 13,507,207 pounds of food, providing meals to 3,750,000 individuals!

“Wasted food still requires resources such as cropland, water, time, and energy. When this food ends up in a landfill, it emits greenhouse gases that are directly linked to climate change,” continued Lara. “Working together with our local partner agencies, volunteers, and supporters we will continue to make a tremendous impact on hunger, food waste, and the planet.”

THE DETAILS
When & Where: September 23rd , 2023, from 5-9 p.m. at The Betty Reckas Cultural Center in Long Beach.
Sponsors: Banc Of California, California Resources Corp, Servicon, Port of Long Beach, Laserfiche, Commercial Bank, Albertsons, Oak Ridge Winery, City National Bank, Smart & Final, Epson, F&M Bank, Grocery Outlet, the Los Angeles Lakers, AES, Marathon
How much: VIP tickets are $175, General Admission are $125, and there are only 350 seats available! http://foodfinders.org/event/farm-to-tableaux-fun-fabulous-frida

To purchase tickets for the event, visit https://foodfindersinc.ejoinme.org/tickets. For information on available sponsorships packages, please visit https://foodfindersinc.ejoinme.org/sponsorships.

About Food Finders
Food Finders’ mission is to eliminate hunger and food waste while improving nutrition in food-
insecure communities. Food Finders links surplus food from local businesses to non-profit partners
providing food-insecure households and individuals with a meal or food pantry service. Their
operation spans a four-county area that includes Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino, and Riverside.

Media Contacts: Diana Lara, dlara@foodfinders.org,562-283-1400×101

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Climate

A Nutrition Student’s Journey To Make An Impact

As a full-time Dietetics and Food Administration, Nutrition and Nutritional Science Option, BS student at California State University, Long Beach, and intern at Food Finders, nutrition and reducing hunger and food waste are an important part of my life.  I learned in my junior year of school at California State, Long Beach how many people in the United States go to bed hungry every night, so many of them children, and my heart broke. I knew then that my passion for nutrition and eating for wellness was not all I was passionate about.

 I quickly became vested in learning how I could not only educate people on the benefits of healthy eating but also reducing food waste, repurposing food, and getting food to those in need. 

I realized that my knack for meal planning and shopping on a limited budget was something that I understand and was a big part of helping people to reduce food waste. The question for me was how could I combine these two skills and make a bigger impact. 

Food Waste is a Problem

Food waste is a huge problem in the United States with the vast majority of waste occurring in the home. Poor planning and expiration dates on the food we purchase are large contributors.  Many would rather toss food they aren’t sure about, which affects the environment’s equity, than risk getting a foodborne illness.  

Repurposing, Resources, and Education is the answer!

We work hard to plan and implement food repurposing through the Partner Agency Coordinators. 

Additionally, we are working hard to provide education and resources that explain not only how to properly store food but how to interpret the various expiration dates we see on food such as “use by”, ‘sell by”, etc. 

The FoodKeepers application supported by the USDA is a great resource to help people sort through the confusing world of labels and dates.  It can help you not only interpret the varying expiration date labels, but also can explain the best storage methods for various foods to reduce waste. 

Meal Planning

Meal planning is one of the biggest ways that all of us can stop food waste. Who hasn’t gone to the grocery store hungry and bought more than they needed?

When you plan your meals or even just your shopping, it reduces food waste.  And don’t forget that planning ahead is also easy on your wallet—a big plus! By planning your meals for the week and then creating your shopping list based on your meals can cut waste by 15% or more.  

Here’s a recipe that will guide you to the deliciousness of potato peel chips.  Not only are they delicious but you are reducing food waste by repurposing your peels into a crunchy snack or appetizer that has a ton more potassium and magnesium than the flesh of the potato as well as 12 times the antioxidants, so eat up.

https://www.thekitchn.com/heres-why-you-should-never-throw-out-potato-peelings-tips-from-the-kitchn-212565

Tip For Cutting Food Waste

  • Shop the grocery store’s weekly ads. With the cost of food up by 25% or more, finding proteins that are on sale that week is where I start my meal planning.
  • I do NOT go to the store hungry. Going grocery shopping hungry guarantees I will buy some overpriced and over-processed snack that I promptly eat on the way home.  This not only takes me out of budget but is unhealthy.  
  • I stick to my list.
  • I prepare my fruits and veggies for the week.  If I have salads planned I pre-cut and wash my lettuce, carrots, red cabbage, and cucumbers. I also wash and cut up any melons or fruit for the week as well.  Doing this makes busy weeks easier and allows for a nutritious snack of fruit that is easy to grab.

Nutrition Talks Program

This is all information I use when in our Nutrition Talks Program with our partner agencies.  I do a basic overview of nutrition and its importance with interactive tools that keep people engaged in what they are learning. One example is my Nutrition Facts Label workshop which starts with a scavenger hunt looking for a pantry item with a nutrition facts label and ties up with a Q & A on what was learned.  This month I will be visiting Long Beach City College for an interactive demonstration on how to repurpose fruits and vegetables. 

Working with the City of Long Beach to get nutrition education to Long Beach City College is just one way we do our part to reduce waste by repurposing food.  It isn’t enough that we are getting food into the hands of those in need but also to educate them on the many nutrient-dense meals that can be created while reducing waste.   

#StopFoodWasteWednesday #nutritiontalks #tipsforzerowaste #foodfindersinc #LBrecovers #healthyactivelongbeach

Kelly Alarcon, Student at California State University, Long Beach with a concentration in Nutrition and Nutritional Science has a passion for showing others the path to wellness through nutrition while reducing hunger and food waste.  https://www.linkedin.com/in/kelly-alarcon-194313220/

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Climate

White Bean Soup

#MeatlessMonday

Why Meatless Monday?

  • Meatless Monday is of utmost importance, especially in the United States, as we consume much more animal products than the rest of the world.
  • The meat industry uses vast amounts of our finite fossil fuels and water and lots of grain to feed livestock, which is extremely inefficient. Why not use those resources to feed people more directly?
  • About 1,850 gallons of water is needed to produce a singular pound of beef, comparable to only 39 gallons of water per pound of vegetables. A vegetarian diet alone could dramatically reduce water consumption by 58% per person!
  • Meat production also is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, which has proven to correlate to the climate change crisis. 
  • Some benefits of eating plant-based once a week include:
    • Save 133 gallons of water with each meatless meal!
    • Reduce your carbon footprint by 8 pounds each Meatless Monday you participate in
    • If you commit to participating in Meatless Monday every Monday, that is equivalent to skipping one serving of beef for a year, would save the same amount of emissions as driving 348 miles in a car.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 25 minutes

If you ever thought that beans are boring, this creamy flavor-packed white bean soup will blow your mind! This is a simple, vegan and budget-friendly recipe that tastes and smells amazing. Added bonus? It will be on the table in 25 minutes!

Ingredients

  • 2 cans (28oz – 800 grams) cannellini beans or white beans, drained 
  • 1 medium-size onion, diced
  • 1 celery stalk, diced
  • 1 large carrot, diced
  • 1-2 garlic cloves, diced or pressed
  • 1 cup (7 oz – 200 grams), frozen spinach * (optional)
  • 2 medium-size potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil, plus more for serving
  • 1 Tbsp tomato paste
  • 1/3 cup (80 ml) white wine
  • 1 sprig rosemary (or 1 Tbsp of chopped fresh leaves/1/2 tsp of dried)
  • 2 cups (500 ml) vegetable broth or hot water
  • 1/2 tsp paprika (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp fine salt, plus more to taste
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper, plus more to taste

Cooking Instructions

  1. Warm the olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Once the oil is shimmering, add the diced onion, carrot, and celery. Cook, stirring often, until the onion has softened and is turning translucent, about 5 minutes.
  2. Add the garlic, beans, tomato paste, potatoes, rosemary (whole sprig, chopped, or dried, whatever it’s easier for you) and paprika (if you use it). Cook stirring frequently, about 1 minute. 
  3. Add the wine, stir well and let it simmer until it has evaporated, cooking for another minute.
  4. Then add the frozen spinach, the vegetable broth and a good pinch of salt and pepper. Raise the heat and bring the mixture to a boil, then cover the pot, reduce heat and cook gently for 15 minutes.
  5. When the potatoes are soft and the soup is thick and creamy, remove the pot from heat, then remove the sprig rosemary*. Taste and season with salt and pepper. (I usually add a pinch of salt at the beginning + 1/2 tsp later. You might need more salt, depending on your vegetable broth and on your personal preferences.)*
  6. Divide into bowls, drizzle with olive oil or extra virgin olive oil, and more freshly ground black pepper if you like. Serve with crusty whole grain bread and, if you don’t keep it vegan, add freshly grated parmesan cheese for extra flavor. Enjoy!

Notes

Seasoning: If you use a broth that tastes quite salty on its own, it’s important to adjust the seasoning at the end and not at the beginning as you never really know how strong the salt from the broth is. I would start only with a good pinch of salt, no more than that.

Leftover: it keeps well in the fridge for up to 3 days. t’s also freezable: divide among airtight containers (leaving 1-inch space at the top), and freeze up to 2 months.

Rosemary: I’ve got a massive bush of rosemary in my garden, and I always use a fresh sprig. If you use a fresh rosemary sprig, keep in mind it will lose its leaves into the soup. They don’t bother me, but you might want to take them off before serving, or to chop them before cooking.

Vegetables: I usually go for frozen spinach, it really comes in handy. If you prefer, you could swap the spinach for greens such as chopped kale or chard. However, if you use fresh spinach, add them to the pot in the last 5 minutes of cooking. Chard or kale might take a bit longer, between 5 and 10 minutes.

Frozen spinach: the weight is from frozen, but you can swap frozen spinach for a 10-oz bag of fresh spinach if you prefer.

Nutrition

  • Calories: 350kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 57g
  • Protein: 19g
  • Fat: 5g
  • Saturated Fat: 1g
  • Sodium: 160mg
  • Potassium: 1593mg
  • Fiber: 13g
  • Sugar: 5g
  • Vitamin A: 14400IU
  • Vitamin C: 18mg
  • Calcium: 238mg
  • Iron: 9mg

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #meatlessmondays, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

Katia. (2021, April 6). The best white bean soup. The clever meal. Retrieved February 28, 2023.

#meatlessmonday #foodfindersinc  #FoodRescue #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Climate

Pasta with Spinach

#MeatlessMonday

Why Meatless Monday?

  • Meatless Monday is of utmost importance, especially in the United States, as we consume much more animal products than the rest of the world.
  • The meat industry uses vast amounts of our finite fossil fuels and water and lots of grain to feed livestock, which is extremely inefficient. Why not use those resources to feed people more directly?
  • About 1,850 gallons of water is needed to produce a singular pound of beef, comparable to only 39 gallons of water per pound of vegetables. A vegetarian diet alone could dramatically reduce water consumption by 58% per person!
  • Meat production also is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, which has proven to correlate to the climate change crisis. 
  • Some benefits of eating plant-based once a week include:
    • Save 133 gallons of water with each meatless meal!
    • Reduce your carbon footprint by 8 pounds each Meatless Monday you participate in
    • If you commit to participating in Meatless Monday every Monday, that is equivalent to skipping one serving of beef for a year, would save the same amount of emissions as driving 348 miles in a car.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 15 minutes

This simple pasta with spinach is fast, easy and delicious. It’s ready in less than 15 minutes and makes a weeknight meal the whole family will love: creamy, packed with spinach, and convenient. Recipe yields 4 medium-sized servings.

Ingredients

Pasta

  • 8oz (225 grams) pasta (penne, rigatoni, spaghetti…)

Spinach Sauce

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil or extra virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, finely sliced or minced
  • 9oz (250 grams) baby spinach, washed
  • ¼ tsp fine salt, plus more to taste
  • 5oz (140 grams) cream cheese
  • 1oz (30 grams) freshly grated parmesan cheese, plus more to serve
  • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg, or ⅓ of freshly grated nutmeg, or according to taste
  • black pepper, to taste

Cooking Instructions

  1. Cook your pasta until al dente following the package directions. Before draining, reserve at least 1/2 cup of pasta cooking water and set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
  3. Add garlic and cook for about 1 or 2 minutes until fragrant (make sure you don’t burn it).
  4. Add part of the spinach and season with salt. Stir until wilted adding handful of spinach at a time.
  5. When the spinach are wilted but still bright green, stir in cream cheese and 1/3 cup of pasta cooking water (don’t add all the reserved water straight away, but save the rest in case you need to loosen the sauce when you add pasta to the skillet).
  6. Then add grated parmesan cheese and nutmet to the sauce and give a good stir. The sauce will be ready in a couple of minutes.
  7. Drain pasta, add to the skillet and toss to combine. Serve immediately ¼with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, black pepper and freshly grated parmesan cheese. Enjoy.

Notes

SEASONING: I find that 1/4 tsp of salt is fine for the sauce. Both cooking pasta water and parmesan cheese contain salt, so you’re not supposed to add any salt to the spinach sauce. However, before adding pasta, taste and make sure you’re happy with the seasoning.

LEFTOVERS: it keeps well for a couple of days in the fridge, stored in an air-tight container. Add a tiny splash of water to loosen up the sauce if needed and reheat it on the stove or in the microwave.

NOTE: nutritional values are estimates only.

Nutrition

  • Calories: 544kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 62g
  • Protein: 19g
  • Fat: 25g
  • Saturated Fat: 12g
  • Cholesterol: 60mg
  • Sodium: 567mg
  • Potassium: 709mg
  • Fiber: 4g
  • Sugar: 4g
  • Vitamin A: 8527IU
  • Vitamin C: 24mg
  • Calcium: 259mg
  • Iron: 4mg

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #meatlessmondays, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

Katia. (2021, March 28). Pasta with spinach, Easy & Quick! The clever meal. Retrieved February 28, 2023.

#meatlessmonday #foodfindersinc  #FoodRescue #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Climate

Pizza with Peppers (No-Knead Recipes)

#MeatlessMonday

Why Meatless Monday?

  • Meatless Monday is of utmost importance, especially in the United States, as we consume much more animal products than the rest of the world.
  • The meat industry uses vast amounts of our finite fossil fuels and water and lots of grain to feed livestock, which is extremely inefficient. Why not use those resources to feed people more directly?
  • About 1,850 gallons of water is needed to produce a singular pound of beef, comparable to only 39 gallons of water per pound of vegetables. A vegetarian diet alone could dramatically reduce water consumption by 58% per person!
  • Meat production also is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, which has proven to correlate to the climate change crisis. 
  • Some benefits of eating plant-based once a week include:
    • Save 133 gallons of water with each meatless meal!
    • Reduce your carbon footprint by 8 pounds each Meatless Monday you participate in
    • If you commit to participating in Meatless Monday every Monday, that is equivalent to skipping one serving of beef for a year, would save the same amount of emissions as driving 348 miles in a car.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Proofing and Stretching: 1 hour 10 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes

This scrumptious pizza with peppers is a real treat for any pizza lover! It’s crusty, full of flavor, and packed with juicy peppers, soft mozzarella and fresh basil leaves. This is truly a terrific vegetarian pizza that smells and tastes amazing.

Added bonus? It uses a great pizza dough, super EASY to make in 1 bowl: all you have to do is mix the ingredients with a spoon, no mess and no kneading are required. We love peppers because they pack so much flavor, they keep well in the fridge, they’re healthy and so versatile. Cook them slowly in olive oil to bring out that delicious sweet flavor. Take your time here, it’s worth it.

Serve this amazing pizza with bell peppers with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and plenty of fresh basil leaves. And have a great pizza night!

Ingredients

Pizza Dough

  • 1 ½ cup + 2 Tbsp (210 grams) all-purpose flour or bread flour
  • ½ tsp instant yeast (or Active yeast, see notes)
  • ½ tsp fine salt
  • ¾ cup lukewarm water
  • ¾ Tbsp olive oil

Topping

  • 1 ½ Tbsp olive oil
  • 4 medium-sized bell peppers, deseeded and cut into slices (green peppers or frozen mixed peppers are fine too)
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • salt & pepper, to taste
  • 5 oz (140 grams) fresh mozzarella, shredded
  • Fresh basil leaves, to garnish

Cooking Instructions

Pizza Dough

  1. In a large bowl mix flour, instant yeast, and salt until combined.
  2. Add water, olive oil, and stir with a spatula to incorporate the dry ingredients into the liquid. The dough is sticky, it doesn’t look smooth, and a few lumps are totally fine.
  3. LET THE DOUGH PROOF: cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a damp tea towel, place in a warm place, and let it rest for 1 hour, or just until the dough doubles in sized.
  4. When the dough is ready and fluffy, preheat the oven to 440°F/230°C, and cut a large piece of parchment paper (if you use a pizza stone) or use the parchment paper to line a large baking pan.
  5. SHAPE THE DOUGH: scrape the edges of the bowl with a spatula and pour the dough onto the parchment paper, dust with some flour and starting from the center gently press it out with your fingers until you get approx a 9×13 inch pizza. Let it rest for 10 minutes if time allows..
  6. TOPPING: top with shredded mozzarella, peppers, and season with fine salt and cracked black pepper.
  7. BAKE: bake in the lower shelf of the oven for 15 minutes or until nice and crusty.
  8. Serve with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, and fresh basil leaves.

Peppers

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large non-stick pan, then add the sliced peppers, season with fine salt and cracked black pepper, cover with a lid and cook over medium heat for about 25 minutes. Stir frequently, and add a touch of water only if needed.
  2. When the peppers are done, add the garlic, give a good toss, and cook for another minute.
  3. Taste, adjust the seasoning according to your liking, and set aside.

Notes

YEAST: you can use Active dry yeast instead of instant yeast in this recipe, however, keep in mind Active yeast needs to be activated in water and let it sit until slightly foamy (follow the manufacturer’s instructions).

LUKEWARM WATER:  the water should be mildly warm, not too cold not too hot .

MEASUREMENTS: I use both US cups and grams. The cups of flour are levelled: fill the measuring cup all the way to the top letting the flour flow over a little. Then, use the back of a knife to level the top off.

WATER ABSORPTION: water absorption is the amount of water taken up by flour and may vary significantly depending on the type of flour, brand, and weather conditions. When you add water to the flour, start with the amount stated in the recipe. If the liquid is not enough to achieve the dough consistency, just add gradually a little extra water (1 or 2 Tbsp) until the flour has been incorporated.

HOW LONG DOES WITH PEPPERS LAST?Once pizza is cold, place it in a large freezer bag and refrigerate for up to 2 days in the fridge. Alternately, wrap your pizza in cling film or place it in a freezer bag, make sure you squeeze the air out and freeze it up to 2 months. Defrost at room temperature. Toast your leftover pizza in the oven, enjoy.

Nutrition facts: please note that the nutrition values are based on an online nutrition calculator.  It’s an estimate only and it should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice. The nutrition values are for one small serving (about  6 x 4 inches each), the final drizzle of olive oil is not included.

Nutrition

  • Calories: 257kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 30g
  • Protein: 9g
  • Fat: 11g
  • Saturated Fat: 4g
  • Cholesterol: 17mg
  • Sodium: 527mg
  • Potassium: 220mg
  • Fiber: 3g
  • Sugar: 4g
  • Vitamin A: 2630IU
  • Vitamin C: 101mg
  • Calcium: 121mg
  • Iron: 2mg

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #meatlessmondays, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

Katia. (2021, June 29). Pizza with peppers (no-knead recipe). The clever meal. Retrieved February 28, 2023.

#meatlessmonday #foodfindersinc  #FoodRescue #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Green Generation Showcase at CSULB Earl Burns Miller Zen garden

Join Food Finders for the largest sustainability-focused event of the year in Long Beach. The Green Generation Showcase will be held on Thursday, April 20th from 4-7pm at the Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden and we hope you can be there!

Last year, more than 450 students, faculty, university staff, and Long Beach community members gathered for a fun evening featuring live music and a display of sustainability-themed student and faculty research and creative projects.

We hope you will join other campus and local organizations, community groups and green businesses to share your resources and initiatives with an engaged community. Our whole team would be delighted to add Food Finders to our list of participants for what promises to be an inspiring night.

2022 Food Finders Make A Choice
2022 Food Finders Make A Choice

Event Details

When
Where

Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden
1250 Bellflower Boulevard
Long BeachCA 90840
United States

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Black Panther Party Free BreakfastCommunity

The Free Breakfast Movement of the Black Panther Party

Food Finders Food 4 Kids Program

At Food Finders, we always work with community partners to help feed food-insecure communities in Southern California. Our food rescue operations and programs are working to stop food waste by rescuing food from area businesses. We are on a mission to eliminate hunger by delivering this rescued food to local area nonprofits that can distribute the food to people in need. For 34 years, we have been feeding people and preventing food waste from further damaging our climate. Still, we can only do so much to make significant changes to the barriers and challenges preventing communities from thriving and nourishing their families.

During Black History Month, we wanted to explore the changemakers to food justice. Most people don’t think of the Black Panther Party as a leader in food justice. Still, one of the fundamental aspects of the Party was its commitment to serving black communities through various social programs, including ambulance services, health clinics, and the creation of schools. Their most successful social program was the Free Breakfast for Children Program, which provided food for children across the United States.

Black Panther Party Free Breakfast Program. History.com
Black Panther Party Free Breakfast Program, Oakland, California

In 1966, when the Black Panther Party was established, they knew that the children in Oakland, California, were hungry and did not have access to nutritious meals. They understood that the ability to focus and be ready for school is much easier for a child if they have a nutritious breakfast to start the day learning. That is how the free breakfast program started ‘to help ensure kids had a healthy start to the day’. 

By 1971, the Black Panthers had implemented programs in 36 cities across the United States. They served children meals in church basements, community centers, and local cafeterias. Thousand of free meals were served to thousands of young people. A little-known fact is that their efforts ultimately helped to inspire the National School Breakfast program, which expanded to all schools by 1975. 

Here is a description from History.com: 

The first BPP Breakfast Program opened in January 1969 at Father Earl A. Neil’s St. Augustine Episcopal Church in Oakland, California. On the first day of the Free for Children Breakfast Program, Party members fed eleven children. By the end of that week, the number rose to 135 children. According to BPP member Flores Forbes, Panthers “cooked, served the food, knocked on doors to let the people know which apartment the food was being served in.” Less than two months later, the Party opened up another breakfast program at San Francisco’s Sacred Heart Church.

In Los Angeles, Forbes and others spoke to parents and business owners, explaining how the Breakfast Program would help black children “grow and intellectually develop because children can’t learn on empty stomachs.” Forbes later recalled that the response was “overwhelming.” Breakfast Programs were springing up everywhere. During the height of the Party’s influence, the Los Angeles Breakfast Program provided food for an estimated 1,200 children per week. In New Orleans, the BPP’s Breakfast Program fed more than 300 children on a weekly basis.

BPP Food Distribution

As the BPP became overwhelmingly successful, it became mandatory for all chapters to have a Free Breakfast for Children Program. The minimum requirement for the Free Breakfast Program was an available space with tables and chairs for at least fifty people. Panther leaders requested a minimum of ten persons working—two persons on traffic control; one person at the sign in table; one person taking coats and hats; four servers; and two cooks. As a grassroots organization, the BPP relied on the support of ordinary men and women to help fund the Breakfast Programs and the organization as a whole. To that end, members of the Party organized a number of fundraising events in order to collect money, food, and kitchen supplies from local churches and businesses.

https://www.history.com/news/free-school-breakfast-black-panther-party
Black Panther Party Free Breakfast

Black History Month is an opportunity for everyone to learn more about the contributions of people of color in America. The free breakfast movement expanded by the Black Panther Party was a contribution that ultimately helped to feed millions of children who suffer from hunger in our country. Their dedication and sacrifice have lived on to help educate children and lift them out of poverty for over 50 years.

Food Finders and it’s over 500 community nonprofit partners hope to build on this legacy and make a long-lasting impact in the lives of children. We will end childhood hunger when we all understand how nourishment and education cannot be separated. Today we recognize and honor Huey Newton and Bobby Seale for their vision to empower their communities and feed their children.

To Learn More about the Black Panthers watch this PBS Documentary

To learn about Food Finders Food 4 Kids Program.

#BlackHistoryMonth #BlackPantherParty #FreeBreakfast #history #HueyNewton #BobbySeale #FoodFindersInc

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looking back to look ahead blogClimate

Looking Back to Look Ahead: An Overview of 2022

Overview

With 2023 well underway, it is important to take some time to reflect on last year in order to plan for this one. Taking a moment to reflect is key to setting up goals that align with your values, are efficient, effective, and achievable, and push you out of your comfort zone. 

In this article, I will:

  • discuss Food Finders’ impact in 2022,
  • reflect on the implementation of SB 1383, and 
  • provide three key ideas that Food Finders must keep in mind for the new year.

Food Finders: Statistics in 2022

In 2022, Food Finders continued its mission of reducing food waste by reallocating edible surplus to those who are food insecure throughout Southern California. The organization rescued 13,386,801 pounds of food and provided 11,155,668 meals. Through their rescues, Food Finders diverted 7,269,033 million pounds of C02 emissions and saved 6,104,381,256 gallons of water. Food Finders’ mission is to simultaneously reduce food waste and food insecurity through strategic surplus diversion and reallocation. These environmentally conscious goals mitigate the effects of climate change and provide much needed food. Finding methods that solve multiple problems at once is the kind of thinking that guides us closer to a sustainable future.

Greenhouse gas emissions such as methane is released from landfills in huge quantities that pose a threat to human health, NPR.

SB 1383: California’s Law to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

On September 19, 2016, Governor Jerry Brown signed SB 1383 into law which established a statewide initiative to reduce emissions produced by short-lived climate pollutants (SLCP). The targets aim to reduce edible food and organic waste disposal by 75% by 2025, and to rescue at least 20% of disposed edible food to be allocated for human consumption by 2025. The law actually expands upon AB 341 (Mandatory Commercial Recycling) and AB 1826 (Mandatory Commercial Organics) which focused on commercial waste diversion and recycling. SB 1383, on the other hand, applies similar guidelines to residents and property managers and owners. Under the bill—which went into effect on January 1, 2022—jurisdictions are required to provide “organic waste collection services to all single-family and multifamily residences.”

The efforts to reduce food waste reflect the increasing threat greenhouse gases pose for Californians, especially to those with health conditions. In California, organic waste left in landfills release 20% of all methane, a gas that is a “climate super pollutant 84 times more potent than carbon dioxide.” According to the EPA, reducing the presence of food and organic waste in landfills in the United States helps reduce climate change since more than 15% of methane emissions caused by humans come from municipal solid waste landfills. In 2019, those landfills emitted almost 100 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent of methane. California’s dumps in landfills are 50% food scraps, yard trimmings, and cardboard which reflects the need for more conscious efforts when throwing away trash. 

California has specific targets that need to be met in order to reach the goals set by SB 1383, Waste Dive.

SB 1383: Changes, Progress, and What’s Next

According to Waste Dive, California estimates that it will need to prevent 27 million tons of organic waste from ending up in landfills annually by 2025. Unfortunately, 18 million tons of the waste is not “eligible for edible food recovery.” One challenge that companies are facing with implementation lies in the composting infrastructure and equipment to meet the requirements. Some owners have resorted to either selling their businesses to larger competitors or finding new investors.

One major effect that has threatened the timeline is the COVID-19 pandemic. The start of the pandemic impacted the 2020 goals and now California is under pressure to “make up for lost time.” On September 8, 2022, the Hearing on Organic Waste Recycling was held during which Shereen D’Souza, CalEPA’s deputy secretary for climate policy and intergovernmental relations, stated that “it makes sense that the 2020 diversion rates required in 1383 were not met” since the regulations of SB 1383 only became enforceable in 2022. Despite these setbacks, D’Souza concluded that “local jurisdictions are making a lot of progress” since January of last year.

Although the law was passed in 2016, SB 1383 regulations were only enforced in 2022, CalCities.

The most notable changes have been the arrival of waste bins for residents to use. CalRecycle believes that most jurisdictions have adopted the “standard” model or the three-bin system which might be the case since the law’s regulations make “three carts the smoothest path to compliance.” Overall, it is still too early to determine the total effects of SB 1383’s implementation. The Little Hoover Commission, an independent state oversight agency, is currently conducting a study that will “assess how California’s organics recycling law is implemented, examine what impact it has on the state’s environmental goals, and provide recommendations to the Governor and Legislature for any changes.” 

Three Key Areas for Food Finders

As Food Finders’ Community Outreach and Advocacy Intern, I have been tasked with reaching out to different organizations in the industry to understand what their goals are and how they became involved in policy and advocacy work. Over the past few months, I have met with several local and out-of-state organizations who are focused on ending food insecurity, food waste, or like Food Finders, work at the intersection of both issues. Each organization has provided me with insight that exposes their core values which inform their goals and plans regarding policy advocacy. From these meetings, I have compiled three major takeaways that should guide Food Finders in its development of a policy and advocacy agenda that creates lasting systemic change.

Grounding the policy work in the community 

In every single meeting I have had so far, the importance of community has been at the forefront of the conversation. The idea that policy should address the needs of a community cannot be more obvious, and yet, it is often inexplicably neglected. The community should always be involved in decision-making that affects their lives because they carry knowledge that is crucial to their own betterment and longevity. When the policy doesn’t represent the people or align with the community values and concerns, even the kindest intentions are rendered useless without consent and accordance on multiple levels.

One way to create a space for this kind of dialogue is through the inception of a community-led policy council. Oregon Food Bank, an Oregon-based organization that aims to address the root causes of hunger in order to eradicate it, created its Policy Leadership Council in 2021. The Council is composed of community members who are BIPOC, LGBT, have experienced food insecurity and “some sort of oppression” in their lives. Simply put, the Council is made of community members and the community informs the direction of their advocacy. Without input from the Council, the Board would not know how best to address the issues that impact their community. 

Taking the pulse of the community

Taking the pulse of the community regarding food insecurity and food waste is crucial before taking the next step towards policy advocacy. Since Food Finders focuses on finding food (as well as distributing, reallocating, and reducing waste), understanding how the community views the issues of food insecurity, waste, and its impact on the environment is important. Simply asking the questions of What do they know? and What do they want to know? can open up a dialogue and clear the pathway toward aligning food waste and insecurity policies with the values of the community. 

Recognizing the social issues that impact food insecurity

My third and final takeaway encompasses not just food insecurity, but what causes food insecurity. A lack of food does not equal food insecurity which is why more food (read: food waste and overproduction) is not the solution to this persistent problem. Other social circumstances that affect food insecurity are poverty or low income, lack of affordable housing, lack of access to healthcare, and systemic racism and racial discrimination. Thus, addressing the root causes of food insecurity has to be a priority in order to do more than place a band-aid on an already infected wound. Addressing issues such as homelessness, low wages, and affordable housing is what can eliminate food insecurity once and for all.

Homelessness and food insecurity

In 2022, California contributed to 30% of the country’s homeless population even though the state makes up less than 12% of the country’s total population. According to CalMatters, California’s homeless population grew by 22,000 during the pandemic. Although the state’s investment in shelters is “bearing fruit,” there still isn’t enough “permanent, affordable housing to bring people indoors for good.” On February 24, 2022, the “Homeless Count” in Long Beach determined that 1,801 people were living on the streets or other locations, 485 people were found living in cars, vans, and RVs, and 1,009 people were living in emergency shelters and transitional housing programs. Since 2020, there has been a 123% increase in the number of people experiencing homelessness who are sheltered in Long Beach. As we know, newly-elected Mayor Rex Richardson (who recently visited my college campus), undoubtedly has made it clear that homelessness, an issue that affects everyone and spans across the state of California, is a major priority for his administration. During his State of the City on January 10, 2023, Mayor Richardson listed homelessness and stable housing as the first key area to address in his first 100 days. 

On February 24, 2022, 69% of the total homeless population were unsheltered in Long Beach, City of Long Beach.

Another area the pandemic affected was food insecurity. The pandemic exacerbated food insecurity across the nation with the USDA reporting that 13.5 million US households were food insecure in 2021. According to the California Association of Food Banks, 8 million California residents struggle with food insecurity and in Los Angeles County, 30% of low-income residents don’t know where their next meal will come from. Homelessness and hunger are very much linked to one another since individuals experiencing homelessness are often food insecure.

Edible Food Waste: The Solution to Feeding Long Beach’s Homeless Population?

Mayor Richardson’s decision to tackle homelessness in Long Beach is commendable and shows a dedication to all the residents of the city, even the ones who are often invisible. This hefty endeavor will require cooperation and collaboration between different levels of government, various sectors and industries, and the local community. According to Stanford’s Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR), accelerated production of affordable housing, reforms to the criminal justice system, and vast improvements in mental health care are crucial to address California’s homeless problem. Although hunger wasn’t explicitly identified, caring for unhoused residents includes addressing their most basic needs. 

Food waste is an issue that often flies under the radar. Consumers rarely stop and wonder what happens to those packed shelves and towering fruit displays when the store closes. In reality, 30% of the food in American grocery stores is thrown away while a significant amount of food doesn’t even make it to shelves due to cosmetic “imperfections.” Food Finders already works hard to intercept food destined for the landfills so that perfectly edible food can be enjoyed by those who need it throughout Southern California. The bottom line is that there is enough food out there. SB 1383 requires that at least 20% of edible food is recovered for human consumption by 2025, which will result in a “boom” in rescued food. It might be worth noting for Mayor Richardson’s administration that when they are searching for a way to feed the city’s unhoused residents, the food might already be there.

What Can You Do To Help?

Food Finders works daily to change how edible food waste is distributed to eliminate hunger and food insecurity. If you would like more information, please visit our website, volunteer, or support our mission to eliminate hunger and food waste by making a donation today.

#sb1383 #foodwaste #climatechange #foodinsecurity #homelessness #longbeach

Nickee O’Bryant is the Community Outreach and Advocacy Intern at Food Finders. She is a senior at California State University, Long Beach and is studying International Studies and French and Francophone Studies. Through monthly blog posts, Nickee documents her journey as she learns more about food insecurity, food waste, and how they are interconnected.

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Summer To End Hunger Food Drive 2023

Summer Brings Risk of Hunger for Children
* California kids need year-round access to healthy, affordable meals. In California: Children can get free or reduced-price meals during the school year, but over the summer months at school
and community sites.
* Nearly 1 in 4 kids may go to bed hungry.
* Over 2 million children live in households that struggle to put enough food on the table.

Excited about contributing to a wonderful cause this summer? While hosting a Food Drive might not be feasible, you can still make an incredible difference by offering a heartfelt monetary donation to our Summer To End Hunger Food Drive. Your generosity will have a direct, positive impact on our local community, enabling us to provide essential food items to our partner nonprofit agencies serving children in need throughout the rest of the season.

Take action now and make a meaningful donation today by simply clicking on the link HERE or scanning the QR code below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Together, we can make a lasting impact and bring smiles to the faces of those in need.”

Host a Summer To End Hunger Food Food Drive!

Download our Food List: summer to end hunger food list

Sign up below via QR Code or Form to Host a Food Drive

Summer To End Hunger Food Drive
Help Food Finders Feed Kids Over the Summer Months in Southern California

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october community marketplace

Community Marketplace October 2023

The Food Finders Community Marketplace Food Hub at Admiral Kidd Park is a refrigerated container that will offer fresh produce in areas of Long Beach that experience high levels of food insecurity. The hub container can safely store produce, dairy, and other perishable food. Weekly food distribution and monthly programs will take place in close collaboration with Food Finders and our network of community nonprofits.

 

We will post more details on the week of the event.

Are you interested in Sponsoring the Food Hub Community Marketplace this month?

Contact: yuchu@foodfinders.org

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September community marketplace

Community Marketplace September 2023

The Food Finders Community Marketplace Food Hub at Admiral Kidd Park is a refrigerated container that will offer fresh produce in areas of Long Beach that experience high levels of food insecurity. The hub container can safely store produce, dairy, and other perishable food. Weekly food distribution and monthly programs will take place in close collaboration with Food Finders and our network of community nonprofits.

 

We will post more details on the week of the event.

Are you interested in Sponsoring the Food Hub Community Marketplace this month?

Contact: yuchu@foodfinders.org

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August Community Marketplace

Community Marketplace August 2023

The Food Finders Community Marketplace Food Hub at Admiral Kidd Park is a refrigerated container that will offer fresh produce in areas of Long Beach that experience high levels of food insecurity. The hub container can safely store produce, dairy, and other perishable food. Weekly food distribution and monthly programs will take place in close collaboration with Food Finders and our network of community nonprofits.

 

We will post more details on the week of the event.

Are you interested in Sponsoring the Food Hub Community Marketplace this month?

Contact: yuchu@foodfinders.org

READ MORE
August Community Marketplace

Community Marketplace July 2023

The Food Finders Community Marketplace Food Hub at Admiral Kidd Park is a refrigerated container that will offer fresh produce in areas of Long Beach that experience high levels of food insecurity. The hub container can safely store produce, dairy, and other perishable food. Weekly food distribution and monthly programs will take place in close collaboration with Food Finders and our network of community nonprofits.

 

We will post more details on the week of the event.

Are you interested in Sponsoring the Food Hub Community Marketplace this month?

Contact: yuchu@foodfinders.org

READ MORE
May Community Marketplace

Community Marketplace May 2023

The Food Finders Community Marketplace Food Hub at Admiral Kidd Park is a refrigerated container that will offer fresh produce in areas of Long Beach that experience high levels of food insecurity. The hub container can safely store produce, dairy, and other perishable food. Weekly food distribution and monthly programs will take place in close collaboration with Food Finders and our network of community nonprofits.

 

We will post more details on the week of the event.

Are you interested in Sponsoring the Food Hub Community Marketplace this month?

Contact: yuchu@foodfinders.org

READ MORE
April community Marketplace

Community Marketplace April 2023

The Food Finders Community Marketplace Food Hub at Admiral Kidd Park is a refrigerated container that will offer fresh produce in areas of Long Beach that experience high levels of food insecurity. The hub container can safely store produce, dairy, and other perishable food. Weekly food distribution and monthly programs will take place in close collaboration with Food Finders and our network of community nonprofits.

 

We will post more details on the week of the event.

Are you interested in Sponsoring the Food Hub Community Marketplace this month?

Contact: yuchu@foodfinders.org

READ MORE
March Community Marketplace

Community MarketPlace March 2023

The Food Finders Community Marketplace Food Hub at Admiral Kidd Park is a refrigerated container that will offer fresh produce in areas of Long Beach that experience high levels of food insecurity. The hub container can safely store produce, dairy, and other perishable food. Weekly food distribution and monthly programs will take place in close collaboration with Food Finders and our network of community nonprofits.

 

We will post more details on the week of the event.

Are you interested in Sponsoring the Food Hub Community Marketplace this month?

Contact: yuchu@foodfinders.org

READ MORE

Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive – Volunteers Needed

JOIN FOOD FINDERS for the Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive May 13th, 2023

WHO: This is a sign-up form for individuals, companies, and groups who would like to volunteer their time helping Food Finders to sort and pack food donation bags and boxes.
WHAT: Stamp Out Hunger is observed on the second Saturday of May and takes place on May 13. It is the largest food drive in the country and takes place in more than 10,000 cities and towns. Food Finders will be at three to four Local Post Office Locations.
WHEN: Saturday, May 13, 2023
WHERE: (TBD)  Local Area Post Offices (Seal Beach, Lakewood, Long Beach +)

Sign Up Form Below

Stamp Out Hunger Volunteering Sign Up Form
WHO: This is a sign up form for individuals, companies, and groups who would like to volunteer their time helping Food Finders to sort and pack food donation bags and boxes. WHAT: Stamp Out Hunger is observed on the second Saturday of May and takes place on May 13. It is the largest food drive in the country and takes place in more than 10,000 cities and towns. Food Finders will be at three to four Local Post Office Locations. WHEN: Saturday, May 13, 2023 WHERE:(TBD) Local Area Post Offices (Seal Beach, Lakewood, Long Beach +)
We will contact you with the specific times

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Holiday Sort & Pack Food Drive

Individuals and groups can come and help Food Finders pack over 3000 Holiday Food Boxes for those in need. No more volunteers needed at this time

Where:  Mcbride High School, 7025 Parkcrest Street, Long Beach, CA 9080

Date: November 18 & 19, 2023

Our Annual Holiday Food Drive has returned for yet another holiday season of generosity. Each year, Food Finders diligently gathers turkeys and select items, organizing and packaging them into holiday boxes. Subsequently, these boxes are generously contributed to our network of partner agencies for distribution within their respective communities. This year, our goal is to assemble 3,000 boxes to support the Southern California community, maximizing our impact on as many families and communities as possible.

We are deeply grateful to our remarkable community, and we regret to inform you that we are no longer accepting volunteer applications for this event at the present time. All available slots for our 2023 sorting and packing sessions have been filled. If you represent a partner agency and wish to request holiday boxes, we invite you to visit our website at http://foodfinders.org/partner-agency/ and complete the Thanksgiving Donation Request form located at the bottom of the page.

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Meatless Monday Recipe by Soul Fire FarmNutrition

“No Kitchen, No Money, No Time” Recipe

Meatless Monday is a very important day for the planet. It asks each of us to take one day to avoid meat products. Why? Eating less meat reduces demand, greenhouse gas emissions, water pollution, and our carbon footprint, all from changing one simple meal choice

Top 3 Reasons to Go Meatless Once a Week

For the Environment:
* Reduce your carbon footprint
* Minimize Water Usage
* Fight deforestation
* Reduce land degradation
* Protect wildlife and plant Biodiversity
* Reduce Greenhouse Gases

resources_403x403_grain

For Your Health:
* Reduce Heart Disease and Stroke
* Limit Cancer Risk
* Fight Diabetes
* Curb Obesity
* Improve The Nutritional Quality of Your Diet
* Live longer

For Your Wallet:
* Curb Healthcare Spending
* Cut Weekly Budget

Recipe from Soul Fire Farm

Soul Fire Farm is a nonprofit Afro-Indigenous-centered community farm committed to uprooting racism and seeding sovereignty in the food system. They raise and distribute life-giving food as a means to end food apartheid. They teach people to farm, educate all of us about food inequities, and empower people of color through and understanding of the food system.

During Black History Month, we want to share recipes from food justice advocates working to empower and change the food system. Let us know if you prepare this recipe. Share your images and comments. And if you know of a Food Justice Organization in the United States, let us know that too!

Source: Soul Fire Farm

Oatmeal and Fruit
Boil 2 cups of water or milk. Add ¾ cup of regular oats and ½ cup of fruit (such as chopped apple, banana, raisins, pear, or berries.) Add a pinch of salt and a teaspoon of honey or other sweeteners. Continue to cook on low until oats are soft and creamy, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. (serves 2)

Vegetable Soup 
Coat the bottom of a pot lightly with oil, then add one medium chopped onion and 2-3 cloves of chopped garlic. Similar to the onion and garlic in the oil. Add 4 cups of water or vegetable broth and bring to a boil. Add 2 cups of finely chopped vegetables (such as carrots, tomato, greens, celery, squash, and sweet potato.) Continue to cook on medium until the veggies are almost soft. Add 1 cup of cooked/canned beans (such as chickpeas, kidney beans, and black beans.) Add salt, pepper, and herbs to taste (such as oregano, thyme, and basil.) If you did not use broth, mash up a bit of the soup to give the liquid some texture. (serves 4)

Omelette with Toast
Coat the bottom of a skillet lightly with oil and heat it up until water sizzles when dropped on the surface. Crack two eggs into a bowl and beat well. Pour the eggs into the hot oil. Cover the top of the egg with ⅓ cup total of finely chopped onion, spinach (or other green), tomato, and pepper. Add grated cheese as well, if you choose. Use a spatula to fold the egg in half. Flip as needed to cook on both sides. Serve with toast. (serves 1)

Veggie and Fruit w/ Dip 
Mix ½ cup peanut butter and two tablespoons of honey in a bowl. Slice one apple, one carrot, and one celery stalk. Dip the fruits and veggies in the peanut butter mixture and enjoy. (serves 2)

Black History Month

It’s Black History Month, and we’re taking this opportunity to learn and share more about Black History in relation to food, farming, and food justice.

Black History Month originally started as a way to educate students and young people about Black and African-Americans’ contributions, triumphs, and struggles, and it has continued to be a time for commemorating and recognizing their integral role in our history and culture. Their stories are a critical part of our history here in Southern California. Food Finders is always looking for ways to educate and inform people on Food Waste, Food Justice, and the diverse culture that surrounds us–including the many people we serve 365 days a year!

Many significant Black figures have shaped our agriculture system and spearheaded the fight for food justice. We hope that you enjoy this recipe and you take the time to learn more about #MeatlessMonday, #BlackHistoryMonth, and #SoulFireFarm

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Community

Black Leaders in Food Justice

#BlackHistoryMonth

In celebration of Black History Month we are highlighting three black individuals who have had significant contributions in the way that we approach hunger and food justice, both historically and currently. Although communities of color have always had a critical role in shaping our American foodscape, their contributions have historically gone unrecognized. These three advocates offer a peak into these contributions, to engage and learn from not only this month, but at all times.

George Washington Carver is perhaps one of the most honored figures in the black American landscape for his food contributions, specifically the peanut. What many people don’t know about him is that he had a master’s degree in Scientific Agriculture. Born into slavery, he often skirted chores as a child to study plants and eventually found his passion in food and cooking. He obtained a college education as the first black student at Iowa State University, and after joining the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama as the director of agriculture, he made significant strides in helping farmers to efficiently grow crops, best utilize their harvest, and even published bulletins and recipes to distribute to farmers. He was one of the earliest proponents of sustainable agriculture and “conscious eating”. His research made a huge impact on soil fertility and waste reduction in addition to general farming practices.

Dr. Rashida Crutchfield is an associate professor at CSULB, where she initiated a study of student homelessness and hunger. What started as a local concern became a national study, and her passion to lend a voice to those who were displaced and food insecure helped initiate the Office of the Chancellor’s 3-phase study on basic needs, setting a precedent for making student food insecurity and homelessness among students a health priority. She’s since become a respected authority and advocate in this arena, and her findings and strategies to address these issues were published in 2019 as a book.

Ron Finley is a community contributor in downtown L.A., often referred to as the Guerrilla Gardener. Since 2010 he has been actively growing fresh produce for his local neighborhood using abandoned strips of land or parkways. These areas of South Central, often labeled as food deserts, have limited or nonexistent access to fresh fruits and vegetables. The “food prisons” as Finley calls them, impact the health of residents, each of whom deserves equal access to nutritious foods. To tackle this issue, he not only shares his harvest but teaches gardening and the importance of good food and provides a place for residents to gather and form tighter community bonds.


If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger, help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

#BlackHistoryMonth #foodfindersinc  #foodrescue #reducehunger #foodrecovery #volunteer #charity #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #helpendhunger #endhunger #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #donate #makeanimpact

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