Food Waste

August: Recap of Food Waste/Repurposing, Healthy Eating on a Budget & Stretching Resource Dollars

The Continuing Journey of a Nutrition Students Journey To Make An Impact

As I reflect on the last three months of nutrition Blogs, it pleases me to see all of the good
Food Finders does.

In 2022, Food Findersrescued 13,709,033 pounds of food, resulting in Food Finders providing
11,424,195 meals to people living with food insecurity.

What a beautiful example of how rescuing food that would typically go to waste and
repurposing it helps to feed so many people. Food that usually ends up in the trash and
eventually landfills contributes to climate change.
Whether food waste and repurposing, healthy eating on a budget, or stretching resource
dollars to nutrition education. The tools provided help those in need help themselves as
much as possible when struggling with food insecurity.

Food Waste Is A Huge Problem

Food Waste is a problem that isn’t going away, so we must stay vigilant by not losing sight of
the bigger picture. What is the bigger picture, you say? In addition to the many hungry
people who could eat that wasted food caused by poor planning and expiration date
confusion, the long-term effects on the environment are tragic.

Repurposing, Resources, and Education are the Answer!

If you have followed my blog posts, you might get tired of this topic, but I do not care.
I will do whatever it takes to increase awareness of this problem that has a solution.
Food Finders work hard to plan and implement food repurposing through their Partner
Agency Coordinator.
Additionally, Food Finders provides nutrition education and resources to educate the
recipients of this beautiful rescued food on healthy eating, proper storage, and clearing up
expiration date confusion.

Healthy Eating on a Budget

When considering healthy eating on a budget, you’re thinking dollar signs $$$. As a
full-time student and an intern at Food Finders, eating healthy is significant. I shop the sale
ads and plan meals based on what I already have in my pantry and refrigerator, saving time
and money.

However, there is a crucial part of eating healthy on a budget that saves you long-term
that many people do not consider. Many need to consider the long-term health implications
of poor eating habits. Our intricately designed bodies serve us well when we treat them
well. Eating well today can save you thousands, if not more, in medical bills later on. If you
do not treat your body well, you are setting the stage for obesity, type 2 diabetes,
hypertension, and heart disease.

Plan. Eat Well. Live Well.

Stretching Resource Dollars

What are resource dollars?

Your resource dollars can be the cold, hard cash you work so hard for, or it can also be
CalFresh, known federally as SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program). This
July Edition is all about making both work harder for your household.

What is important is how to utilize your resources to get maximum benefit. It’s not that hard if you
employ what I have shared in the last few months. It all ties together. You can stretch your
resource dollars if you use the information you have learned from food waste, repurposing, and
healthy eating on a budget.

Working with the City of Long Beach to get nutrition education to Long Beach City College is
one way we do our part to reduce waste by repurposing food. It isn’t enough that we are getting
food into the hands of those in need but also to educate them on the many nutrient-dense meals
that reduce waste.

#StopFoodWasteDay #NutritionTalks #TipForZeroWaste #FoodFindersInc #LBrecovers #HealthyActiveLongBeach

Kelly Alarcon, a Student at California State University, Long Beach, with a concentration in Nutrition and
Nutritional Science, is passionate about showing others the
path to wellness through nutrition while
reducing hunger and food waste. https://www.linkedin.com/in/kelly-alarcon-194313220

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Climate

White Bean Soup

#MeatlessMonday

Why Meatless Monday?

  • Meatless Monday is of utmost importance, especially in the United States, as we consume much more animal products than the rest of the world.
  • The meat industry uses vast amounts of our finite fossil fuels and water and lots of grain to feed livestock, which is extremely inefficient. Why not use those resources to feed people more directly?
  • About 1,850 gallons of water is needed to produce a singular pound of beef, comparable to only 39 gallons of water per pound of vegetables. A vegetarian diet alone could dramatically reduce water consumption by 58% per person!
  • Meat production also is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, which has proven to correlate to the climate change crisis. 
  • Some benefits of eating plant-based once a week include:
    • Save 133 gallons of water with each meatless meal!
    • Reduce your carbon footprint by 8 pounds each Meatless Monday you participate in
    • If you commit to participating in Meatless Monday every Monday, that is equivalent to skipping one serving of beef for a year, would save the same amount of emissions as driving 348 miles in a car.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 25 minutes

If you ever thought that beans are boring, this creamy flavor-packed white bean soup will blow your mind! This is a simple, vegan and budget-friendly recipe that tastes and smells amazing. Added bonus? It will be on the table in 25 minutes!

Ingredients

  • 2 cans (28oz – 800 grams) cannellini beans or white beans, drained 
  • 1 medium-size onion, diced
  • 1 celery stalk, diced
  • 1 large carrot, diced
  • 1-2 garlic cloves, diced or pressed
  • 1 cup (7 oz – 200 grams), frozen spinach * (optional)
  • 2 medium-size potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil, plus more for serving
  • 1 Tbsp tomato paste
  • 1/3 cup (80 ml) white wine
  • 1 sprig rosemary (or 1 Tbsp of chopped fresh leaves/1/2 tsp of dried)
  • 2 cups (500 ml) vegetable broth or hot water
  • 1/2 tsp paprika (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp fine salt, plus more to taste
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper, plus more to taste

Cooking Instructions

  1. Warm the olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Once the oil is shimmering, add the diced onion, carrot, and celery. Cook, stirring often, until the onion has softened and is turning translucent, about 5 minutes.
  2. Add the garlic, beans, tomato paste, potatoes, rosemary (whole sprig, chopped, or dried, whatever it’s easier for you) and paprika (if you use it). Cook stirring frequently, about 1 minute. 
  3. Add the wine, stir well and let it simmer until it has evaporated, cooking for another minute.
  4. Then add the frozen spinach, the vegetable broth and a good pinch of salt and pepper. Raise the heat and bring the mixture to a boil, then cover the pot, reduce heat and cook gently for 15 minutes.
  5. When the potatoes are soft and the soup is thick and creamy, remove the pot from heat, then remove the sprig rosemary*. Taste and season with salt and pepper. (I usually add a pinch of salt at the beginning + 1/2 tsp later. You might need more salt, depending on your vegetable broth and on your personal preferences.)*
  6. Divide into bowls, drizzle with olive oil or extra virgin olive oil, and more freshly ground black pepper if you like. Serve with crusty whole grain bread and, if you don’t keep it vegan, add freshly grated parmesan cheese for extra flavor. Enjoy!

Notes

Seasoning: If you use a broth that tastes quite salty on its own, it’s important to adjust the seasoning at the end and not at the beginning as you never really know how strong the salt from the broth is. I would start only with a good pinch of salt, no more than that.

Leftover: it keeps well in the fridge for up to 3 days. t’s also freezable: divide among airtight containers (leaving 1-inch space at the top), and freeze up to 2 months.

Rosemary: I’ve got a massive bush of rosemary in my garden, and I always use a fresh sprig. If you use a fresh rosemary sprig, keep in mind it will lose its leaves into the soup. They don’t bother me, but you might want to take them off before serving, or to chop them before cooking.

Vegetables: I usually go for frozen spinach, it really comes in handy. If you prefer, you could swap the spinach for greens such as chopped kale or chard. However, if you use fresh spinach, add them to the pot in the last 5 minutes of cooking. Chard or kale might take a bit longer, between 5 and 10 minutes.

Frozen spinach: the weight is from frozen, but you can swap frozen spinach for a 10-oz bag of fresh spinach if you prefer.

Nutrition

  • Calories: 350kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 57g
  • Protein: 19g
  • Fat: 5g
  • Saturated Fat: 1g
  • Sodium: 160mg
  • Potassium: 1593mg
  • Fiber: 13g
  • Sugar: 5g
  • Vitamin A: 14400IU
  • Vitamin C: 18mg
  • Calcium: 238mg
  • Iron: 9mg

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #meatlessmondays, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

Katia. (2021, April 6). The best white bean soup. The clever meal. Retrieved February 28, 2023.

#meatlessmonday #foodfindersinc  #FoodRescue #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Climate

Pasta with Spinach

#MeatlessMonday

Why Meatless Monday?

  • Meatless Monday is of utmost importance, especially in the United States, as we consume much more animal products than the rest of the world.
  • The meat industry uses vast amounts of our finite fossil fuels and water and lots of grain to feed livestock, which is extremely inefficient. Why not use those resources to feed people more directly?
  • About 1,850 gallons of water is needed to produce a singular pound of beef, comparable to only 39 gallons of water per pound of vegetables. A vegetarian diet alone could dramatically reduce water consumption by 58% per person!
  • Meat production also is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, which has proven to correlate to the climate change crisis. 
  • Some benefits of eating plant-based once a week include:
    • Save 133 gallons of water with each meatless meal!
    • Reduce your carbon footprint by 8 pounds each Meatless Monday you participate in
    • If you commit to participating in Meatless Monday every Monday, that is equivalent to skipping one serving of beef for a year, would save the same amount of emissions as driving 348 miles in a car.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 15 minutes

This simple pasta with spinach is fast, easy and delicious. It’s ready in less than 15 minutes and makes a weeknight meal the whole family will love: creamy, packed with spinach, and convenient. Recipe yields 4 medium-sized servings.

Ingredients

Pasta

  • 8oz (225 grams) pasta (penne, rigatoni, spaghetti…)

Spinach Sauce

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil or extra virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, finely sliced or minced
  • 9oz (250 grams) baby spinach, washed
  • ¼ tsp fine salt, plus more to taste
  • 5oz (140 grams) cream cheese
  • 1oz (30 grams) freshly grated parmesan cheese, plus more to serve
  • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg, or ⅓ of freshly grated nutmeg, or according to taste
  • black pepper, to taste

Cooking Instructions

  1. Cook your pasta until al dente following the package directions. Before draining, reserve at least 1/2 cup of pasta cooking water and set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
  3. Add garlic and cook for about 1 or 2 minutes until fragrant (make sure you don’t burn it).
  4. Add part of the spinach and season with salt. Stir until wilted adding handful of spinach at a time.
  5. When the spinach are wilted but still bright green, stir in cream cheese and 1/3 cup of pasta cooking water (don’t add all the reserved water straight away, but save the rest in case you need to loosen the sauce when you add pasta to the skillet).
  6. Then add grated parmesan cheese and nutmet to the sauce and give a good stir. The sauce will be ready in a couple of minutes.
  7. Drain pasta, add to the skillet and toss to combine. Serve immediately ¼with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, black pepper and freshly grated parmesan cheese. Enjoy.

Notes

SEASONING: I find that 1/4 tsp of salt is fine for the sauce. Both cooking pasta water and parmesan cheese contain salt, so you’re not supposed to add any salt to the spinach sauce. However, before adding pasta, taste and make sure you’re happy with the seasoning.

LEFTOVERS: it keeps well for a couple of days in the fridge, stored in an air-tight container. Add a tiny splash of water to loosen up the sauce if needed and reheat it on the stove or in the microwave.

NOTE: nutritional values are estimates only.

Nutrition

  • Calories: 544kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 62g
  • Protein: 19g
  • Fat: 25g
  • Saturated Fat: 12g
  • Cholesterol: 60mg
  • Sodium: 567mg
  • Potassium: 709mg
  • Fiber: 4g
  • Sugar: 4g
  • Vitamin A: 8527IU
  • Vitamin C: 24mg
  • Calcium: 259mg
  • Iron: 4mg

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #meatlessmondays, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

Katia. (2021, March 28). Pasta with spinach, Easy & Quick! The clever meal. Retrieved February 28, 2023.

#meatlessmonday #foodfindersinc  #FoodRescue #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Climate

Pizza with Peppers (No-Knead Recipes)

#MeatlessMonday

Why Meatless Monday?

  • Meatless Monday is of utmost importance, especially in the United States, as we consume much more animal products than the rest of the world.
  • The meat industry uses vast amounts of our finite fossil fuels and water and lots of grain to feed livestock, which is extremely inefficient. Why not use those resources to feed people more directly?
  • About 1,850 gallons of water is needed to produce a singular pound of beef, comparable to only 39 gallons of water per pound of vegetables. A vegetarian diet alone could dramatically reduce water consumption by 58% per person!
  • Meat production also is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, which has proven to correlate to the climate change crisis. 
  • Some benefits of eating plant-based once a week include:
    • Save 133 gallons of water with each meatless meal!
    • Reduce your carbon footprint by 8 pounds each Meatless Monday you participate in
    • If you commit to participating in Meatless Monday every Monday, that is equivalent to skipping one serving of beef for a year, would save the same amount of emissions as driving 348 miles in a car.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Proofing and Stretching: 1 hour 10 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes

This scrumptious pizza with peppers is a real treat for any pizza lover! It’s crusty, full of flavor, and packed with juicy peppers, soft mozzarella and fresh basil leaves. This is truly a terrific vegetarian pizza that smells and tastes amazing.

Added bonus? It uses a great pizza dough, super EASY to make in 1 bowl: all you have to do is mix the ingredients with a spoon, no mess and no kneading are required. We love peppers because they pack so much flavor, they keep well in the fridge, they’re healthy and so versatile. Cook them slowly in olive oil to bring out that delicious sweet flavor. Take your time here, it’s worth it.

Serve this amazing pizza with bell peppers with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and plenty of fresh basil leaves. And have a great pizza night!

Ingredients

Pizza Dough

  • 1 ½ cup + 2 Tbsp (210 grams) all-purpose flour or bread flour
  • ½ tsp instant yeast (or Active yeast, see notes)
  • ½ tsp fine salt
  • ¾ cup lukewarm water
  • ¾ Tbsp olive oil

Topping

  • 1 ½ Tbsp olive oil
  • 4 medium-sized bell peppers, deseeded and cut into slices (green peppers or frozen mixed peppers are fine too)
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • salt & pepper, to taste
  • 5 oz (140 grams) fresh mozzarella, shredded
  • Fresh basil leaves, to garnish

Cooking Instructions

Pizza Dough

  1. In a large bowl mix flour, instant yeast, and salt until combined.
  2. Add water, olive oil, and stir with a spatula to incorporate the dry ingredients into the liquid. The dough is sticky, it doesn’t look smooth, and a few lumps are totally fine.
  3. LET THE DOUGH PROOF: cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a damp tea towel, place in a warm place, and let it rest for 1 hour, or just until the dough doubles in sized.
  4. When the dough is ready and fluffy, preheat the oven to 440°F/230°C, and cut a large piece of parchment paper (if you use a pizza stone) or use the parchment paper to line a large baking pan.
  5. SHAPE THE DOUGH: scrape the edges of the bowl with a spatula and pour the dough onto the parchment paper, dust with some flour and starting from the center gently press it out with your fingers until you get approx a 9×13 inch pizza. Let it rest for 10 minutes if time allows..
  6. TOPPING: top with shredded mozzarella, peppers, and season with fine salt and cracked black pepper.
  7. BAKE: bake in the lower shelf of the oven for 15 minutes or until nice and crusty.
  8. Serve with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, and fresh basil leaves.

Peppers

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large non-stick pan, then add the sliced peppers, season with fine salt and cracked black pepper, cover with a lid and cook over medium heat for about 25 minutes. Stir frequently, and add a touch of water only if needed.
  2. When the peppers are done, add the garlic, give a good toss, and cook for another minute.
  3. Taste, adjust the seasoning according to your liking, and set aside.

Notes

YEAST: you can use Active dry yeast instead of instant yeast in this recipe, however, keep in mind Active yeast needs to be activated in water and let it sit until slightly foamy (follow the manufacturer’s instructions).

LUKEWARM WATER:  the water should be mildly warm, not too cold not too hot .

MEASUREMENTS: I use both US cups and grams. The cups of flour are levelled: fill the measuring cup all the way to the top letting the flour flow over a little. Then, use the back of a knife to level the top off.

WATER ABSORPTION: water absorption is the amount of water taken up by flour and may vary significantly depending on the type of flour, brand, and weather conditions. When you add water to the flour, start with the amount stated in the recipe. If the liquid is not enough to achieve the dough consistency, just add gradually a little extra water (1 or 2 Tbsp) until the flour has been incorporated.

HOW LONG DOES WITH PEPPERS LAST?Once pizza is cold, place it in a large freezer bag and refrigerate for up to 2 days in the fridge. Alternately, wrap your pizza in cling film or place it in a freezer bag, make sure you squeeze the air out and freeze it up to 2 months. Defrost at room temperature. Toast your leftover pizza in the oven, enjoy.

Nutrition facts: please note that the nutrition values are based on an online nutrition calculator.  It’s an estimate only and it should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice. The nutrition values are for one small serving (about  6 x 4 inches each), the final drizzle of olive oil is not included.

Nutrition

  • Calories: 257kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 30g
  • Protein: 9g
  • Fat: 11g
  • Saturated Fat: 4g
  • Cholesterol: 17mg
  • Sodium: 527mg
  • Potassium: 220mg
  • Fiber: 3g
  • Sugar: 4g
  • Vitamin A: 2630IU
  • Vitamin C: 101mg
  • Calcium: 121mg
  • Iron: 2mg

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #meatlessmondays, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

Katia. (2021, June 29). Pizza with peppers (no-knead recipe). The clever meal. Retrieved February 28, 2023.

#meatlessmonday #foodfindersinc  #FoodRescue #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Black Panther Party Free BreakfastCommunity

The Free Breakfast Movement of the Black Panther Party

Food Finders Food 4 Kids Program

At Food Finders, we always work with community partners to help feed food-insecure communities in Southern California. Our food rescue operations and programs are working to stop food waste by rescuing food from area businesses. We are on a mission to eliminate hunger by delivering this rescued food to local area nonprofits that can distribute the food to people in need. For 34 years, we have been feeding people and preventing food waste from further damaging our climate. Still, we can only do so much to make significant changes to the barriers and challenges preventing communities from thriving and nourishing their families.

During Black History Month, we wanted to explore the changemakers to food justice. Most people don’t think of the Black Panther Party as a leader in food justice. Still, one of the fundamental aspects of the Party was its commitment to serving black communities through various social programs, including ambulance services, health clinics, and the creation of schools. Their most successful social program was the Free Breakfast for Children Program, which provided food for children across the United States.

Black Panther Party Free Breakfast Program. History.com
Black Panther Party Free Breakfast Program, Oakland, California

In 1966, when the Black Panther Party was established, they knew that the children in Oakland, California, were hungry and did not have access to nutritious meals. They understood that the ability to focus and be ready for school is much easier for a child if they have a nutritious breakfast to start the day learning. That is how the free breakfast program started ‘to help ensure kids had a healthy start to the day’. 

By 1971, the Black Panthers had implemented programs in 36 cities across the United States. They served children meals in church basements, community centers, and local cafeterias. Thousand of free meals were served to thousands of young people. A little-known fact is that their efforts ultimately helped to inspire the National School Breakfast program, which expanded to all schools by 1975. 

Here is a description from History.com: 

The first BPP Breakfast Program opened in January 1969 at Father Earl A. Neil’s St. Augustine Episcopal Church in Oakland, California. On the first day of the Free for Children Breakfast Program, Party members fed eleven children. By the end of that week, the number rose to 135 children. According to BPP member Flores Forbes, Panthers “cooked, served the food, knocked on doors to let the people know which apartment the food was being served in.” Less than two months later, the Party opened up another breakfast program at San Francisco’s Sacred Heart Church.

In Los Angeles, Forbes and others spoke to parents and business owners, explaining how the Breakfast Program would help black children “grow and intellectually develop because children can’t learn on empty stomachs.” Forbes later recalled that the response was “overwhelming.” Breakfast Programs were springing up everywhere. During the height of the Party’s influence, the Los Angeles Breakfast Program provided food for an estimated 1,200 children per week. In New Orleans, the BPP’s Breakfast Program fed more than 300 children on a weekly basis.

BPP Food Distribution

As the BPP became overwhelmingly successful, it became mandatory for all chapters to have a Free Breakfast for Children Program. The minimum requirement for the Free Breakfast Program was an available space with tables and chairs for at least fifty people. Panther leaders requested a minimum of ten persons working—two persons on traffic control; one person at the sign in table; one person taking coats and hats; four servers; and two cooks. As a grassroots organization, the BPP relied on the support of ordinary men and women to help fund the Breakfast Programs and the organization as a whole. To that end, members of the Party organized a number of fundraising events in order to collect money, food, and kitchen supplies from local churches and businesses.

https://www.history.com/news/free-school-breakfast-black-panther-party
Black Panther Party Free Breakfast

Black History Month is an opportunity for everyone to learn more about the contributions of people of color in America. The free breakfast movement expanded by the Black Panther Party was a contribution that ultimately helped to feed millions of children who suffer from hunger in our country. Their dedication and sacrifice have lived on to help educate children and lift them out of poverty for over 50 years.

Food Finders and it’s over 500 community nonprofit partners hope to build on this legacy and make a long-lasting impact in the lives of children. We will end childhood hunger when we all understand how nourishment and education cannot be separated. Today we recognize and honor Huey Newton and Bobby Seale for their vision to empower their communities and feed their children.

To Learn More about the Black Panthers watch this PBS Documentary

To learn about Food Finders Food 4 Kids Program.

#BlackHistoryMonth #BlackPantherParty #FreeBreakfast #history #HueyNewton #BobbySeale #FoodFindersInc

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Meatless Monday Recipe by Soul Fire FarmNutrition

“No Kitchen, No Money, No Time” Recipe

Meatless Monday is a very important day for the planet. It asks each of us to take one day to avoid meat products. Why? Eating less meat reduces demand, greenhouse gas emissions, water pollution, and our carbon footprint, all from changing one simple meal choice

Top 3 Reasons to Go Meatless Once a Week

For the Environment:
* Reduce your carbon footprint
* Minimize Water Usage
* Fight deforestation
* Reduce land degradation
* Protect wildlife and plant Biodiversity
* Reduce Greenhouse Gases

resources_403x403_grain

For Your Health:
* Reduce Heart Disease and Stroke
* Limit Cancer Risk
* Fight Diabetes
* Curb Obesity
* Improve The Nutritional Quality of Your Diet
* Live longer

For Your Wallet:
* Curb Healthcare Spending
* Cut Weekly Budget

Recipe from Soul Fire Farm

Soul Fire Farm is a nonprofit Afro-Indigenous-centered community farm committed to uprooting racism and seeding sovereignty in the food system. They raise and distribute life-giving food as a means to end food apartheid. They teach people to farm, educate all of us about food inequities, and empower people of color through and understanding of the food system.

During Black History Month, we want to share recipes from food justice advocates working to empower and change the food system. Let us know if you prepare this recipe. Share your images and comments. And if you know of a Food Justice Organization in the United States, let us know that too!

Source: Soul Fire Farm

Oatmeal and Fruit
Boil 2 cups of water or milk. Add ¾ cup of regular oats and ½ cup of fruit (such as chopped apple, banana, raisins, pear, or berries.) Add a pinch of salt and a teaspoon of honey or other sweeteners. Continue to cook on low until oats are soft and creamy, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. (serves 2)

Vegetable Soup 
Coat the bottom of a pot lightly with oil, then add one medium chopped onion and 2-3 cloves of chopped garlic. Similar to the onion and garlic in the oil. Add 4 cups of water or vegetable broth and bring to a boil. Add 2 cups of finely chopped vegetables (such as carrots, tomato, greens, celery, squash, and sweet potato.) Continue to cook on medium until the veggies are almost soft. Add 1 cup of cooked/canned beans (such as chickpeas, kidney beans, and black beans.) Add salt, pepper, and herbs to taste (such as oregano, thyme, and basil.) If you did not use broth, mash up a bit of the soup to give the liquid some texture. (serves 4)

Omelette with Toast
Coat the bottom of a skillet lightly with oil and heat it up until water sizzles when dropped on the surface. Crack two eggs into a bowl and beat well. Pour the eggs into the hot oil. Cover the top of the egg with ⅓ cup total of finely chopped onion, spinach (or other green), tomato, and pepper. Add grated cheese as well, if you choose. Use a spatula to fold the egg in half. Flip as needed to cook on both sides. Serve with toast. (serves 1)

Veggie and Fruit w/ Dip 
Mix ½ cup peanut butter and two tablespoons of honey in a bowl. Slice one apple, one carrot, and one celery stalk. Dip the fruits and veggies in the peanut butter mixture and enjoy. (serves 2)

Black History Month

It’s Black History Month, and we’re taking this opportunity to learn and share more about Black History in relation to food, farming, and food justice.

Black History Month originally started as a way to educate students and young people about Black and African-Americans’ contributions, triumphs, and struggles, and it has continued to be a time for commemorating and recognizing their integral role in our history and culture. Their stories are a critical part of our history here in Southern California. Food Finders is always looking for ways to educate and inform people on Food Waste, Food Justice, and the diverse culture that surrounds us–including the many people we serve 365 days a year!

Many significant Black figures have shaped our agriculture system and spearheaded the fight for food justice. We hope that you enjoy this recipe and you take the time to learn more about #MeatlessMonday, #BlackHistoryMonth, and #SoulFireFarm

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Food Waste

Crumb-y Green Lasagna

#WhyWasteWednesday

#WhyWasteFood Wednesday is a call to action to take those almost-in-the-trash food items and turn them into delicious meals!

At least 1.3 billion tons of food is lost or wasted every year around the world—in fields, during transport, in storage, at restaurants, and in our homes! If each individual made a call to action to stop their own food waste–the planet benefits, we have less hunger, and your own grocery bills will go down through the savings.

UN Food & Agriculture

Scraps: Soured Milk, Overripe Tomatoes,  Stale Bread, Wilted Greens

Crumb-y Green Lasagna

Fall bounty can get away from you and this recipe is a perfect chance to play catch-up. Preserve your fall garlic crop by confiting it and storing it in the fridge. Tired, blemished tomatoes can be trimmed to make a hearty sauce. Accumulate soft tomatoes in the freezer until you have enough to make a sauce. Wilted and neglected greens from spinach, chard, or kale can be sautéed into new life as a filling for this classic-style lasagna.

Ricotta

Ingredients

  • 12½ cups (3 L) soured milk, 3.25%
  • 1½ cups (350 ml) cream, 35%
  • 2 lemons, juice and zest
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 tsp (12 g) sea salt

Directions

  1. Heat the soured milk and cream in a heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat, stirring often so it does not scorch on the bottom.
  2. Bring to 195°F (90°C) and stir in the lemon juice and zest.
  3. Remove from heat and stir for 2 minutes until curds form.
  4. Line a large strainer with a clean towel or a piece of cheesecloth that is 4 layers thick.
  5. Pour the mixture into the strainer and let sit for whey to drain for 1 hour.
  6. Reserve whey for future use.
  7. When the ricotta has drained, transfer to a small bowl and cover.
  8. Refrigerate for 2 hours. When cool, mix the ricotta with the eggs and sea salt. Ricotta can be refrigerated for up to 5 days.

Green Confit

Ingredients

  • 12 large cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1¼ cup (300 ml) grapeseed oil

Directions

  1. Submerge the garlic cloves in a small pot filled with grapeseed oil
  2. Bring to a low simmer and reduce heat to lowest possible level. Simmer until garlic is soft when pierced with a fork, about 1 hour.
  3. Remove from heat and cool. Store the garlic in the oil and refrigerate immediately until ready to use. Use within a few days of preparing.

Tomato Sauce

Ingredients

  • ½ cup (125 ml) olive oil
  • ½ yellow onion, peeled and finely diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 2 lbs (900 g) tomatoes (can be spotty
  • and soft), bad spots removed, chopped
  • 1 tbsp (2½ g) fresh thyme leaves,
  • removed from stems
  • 1 tbsp (1½ g) rosemary, chopped
  • 2 tsp (12 g) sea salt
  • 1 tbsp (7 g) smoked paprika

Directions

  1. Heat the olive oil on medium low in a medium-sized saucepan, and add the onion and garlic.
  2. Cook for 5 minutes until translucent.
  3. Add the tomatoes, herbs, sea salt, and paprika.
  4. Simmer over low heat, stirring occasionally until the sauce coats the back of a spoon, about 30 minutes.
  5. Adjust seasoning to taste and set aside.

Olive Oil Crumb

Ingredients

  • 2 slices stale bread
  • 1 tbsp (15 ml) olive oil
  • 1 pinch sea salt

Directions

  1. Remove crusts from the bread if they are very hard.
  2. Blitz bread in a food processor until crumbly.
  3. Pour into a bowl and dress with the olive oil and sea salt.
  4. Spread on a small sheet pan and toast in a 300°F (150°C) degree oven until dry.
  5. Stir every 2 to 3 minutes to ensure even cooking.
  6. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool.

Lasagna Assembly

Ingredients

  • 8 cups (240 g) wilted greens such as kale,
  • chard, spinach, washed and dried
  • 2 tbsp (30 ml) olive oil
  • 4 cups (1 L) tomato sauce (on previous page)
  • 12 pieces cooked lasagna noodles
  • 2¾ cups (687 ml) ricotta (recipe above)
  • 12 cloves garlic from garlic confit
  • (on previous page)
  • 1 cup (225 g) mozzarella cheese, grated
  • 1½ cups (300 g) pecorino cheese, grated
  • Olive oil crumb (recipe above)

Directions

  1. Sauté the greens in the olive oil.
  2. In a 9×9-inch (22 cm x 22 cm) non-reactive pan, layer ⅓ of the tomato sauce on the base of the pan.
  3. Top with ⅓ of the lasagna noodles, covering with an even layer.
  4. Top with ½ of the ricotta mixture and 12 cloves of garlic, removed from the garlic confit.
  5. Layer another ⅓ of the lasagna noodles on top.
  6. Add another ⅓ of the tomato sauce and top with the final ⅓ of lasagna noodles.
  7. Top with the remaining ricotta and then sautéed greens.
  8. Finish with the remaining tomato sauce and sprinkle both cheeses and olive oil crumbs on top.
  9. Bake in a 375°F (190°C) oven for 45 minutes until hot throughout.
  10. Divide into 6 portions and serve with crusty bread or a green salad.

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #whywastewednesday, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

#whywastewednesday  #foodfindersinc  #foodrescue #stopfoodwaste #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #climatechange #foodupcycling #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

The scrapsbook. IKEA. (n.d.). Retrieved October 18, 2022.

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Nutrition

Roasted Sweet Potato Salad with Orange Vinaigrette

Why Meatless Monday?

  • Meatless Monday is of utmost importance, especially in the United States, as we consume much more animal products than the rest of the world.
  • The meat industry uses vast amounts of our finite fossil fuels and water and lots of grain to feed livestock, which is extremely inefficient. Why not use those resources to feed people more directly?
  • About 1,850 gallons of water is needed to produce a singular pound of beef, comparable to only 39 gallons of water per pound of vegetables. A vegetarian diet alone could dramatically reduce water consumption by 58% per person!
  • Meat production also is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, which has proven to correlate to the climate change crisis. 
  • Some benefits of eating plant-based once a week include:
    • Save 133 gallons of water with each meatless meal!
    • Reduce your carbon footprint by 8 pounds each Meatless Monday you participate in
    • If you commit to participating in Meatless Monday every Monday, that is equivalent to skipping one serving of beef for a year, would save the same amount of emissions as driving 348 miles in a car.

“This salad has all of our favorite elements–crunchy bites, creamy goat cheese, fresh greens, and the rich sweetness of roasted sweet potato, all with a tangy citrus dressing.”

Serves: 6

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 5 ounces Baby Spinach, about 3 cups
  • 5 ounces Baby Arugula, about 3 cups
  • 4 ounces goat cheese, crumbled
  • 1 apple, preferably sweet, cut into matchsticks
  • 3 cups Roasted Sweet Potatoes
  • 1½ cups Candied Pecans
  • ¾ cup Orange Vinaigrette

Cooking Instructions

  1. In a large serving bowl, toss the spinach, arugula, ¾ of the goat cheese, ¾ of the apple, 2 cups roasted sweet potato, and 1 cup candied pecans with ¾ of the orange vinaigrette until everything is coated.
  2. Top the salad with the remaining goat cheese, apples, sweet potatoes, and pecans. Drizzle with the remaining dressing and serve immediately.

Nutrition

  • Calories 386
  • Protein 6g
  • Carbohydrates 33g
  • Total Fat 27g
  • Dietary Fiber 5g
  • Cholesterol 0mg
  • Sodium 251mg
  • Total Sugars 17g

Roasted sweet potato salad with Orange Vinaigrette. The Modern Proper. (n.d.). Retrieved November 10, 2022.

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #meatlessmondays, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

#meatlessmonday #foodfindersinc #hunger #hunger #FoodRescue #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Food Waste

Honey-Roasted Whole Carrot

#WhyWasteWednesday

#WhyWasteFood Wednesday is a call to action to take those almost-in-the-trash food items and turn them into delicious meals!

At least 1.3 billion tons of food is lost or wasted every year around the world—in fields, during transport, in storage, at restaurants, and in our homes! If each individual made a call to action to stop their own food waste–the planet benefits, we have less hunger, and your own grocery bills will go down through the savings.

UN Food & Agricultural

Scraps: Whole Carrots with greens, Cilantro with white roots

This recipe uses the entire carrot, including the tops, and also an uncommon part of the cilantro, the white roots. They’re pungent and slightly peppery, which is a perfect complement to the carrot top chimichurri.

Chimichurri

Ingredients

  • 2 bunches carrots, with green tops
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 1 tbsp (15 ml) red wine vinegar
  • ½ bunch cilantro, white roots attached
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) olive oil

Cooking Instructions

  1. Rinse the carrots well, then remove the tops and set the carrots aside.
  2. In a food processor, pulse the garlic, shallot, red wine vinegar, cilantro, carrot tops, and olive oil until finely chopped (see notes).
  3. Allow the chimichurri to sit refrigerated for at least 2 hours so the greens soften and flavor the olive oil.

Roasted Whole Carrots

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (118 g) chopped walnuts
  • 2 carrots, tops and greens removed
  • 2 tbsp (30 ml) grapeseed oil
  • Salt to taste
  • Black pepper to taste
  • 1 cup (250 ml) yogurt
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) sriracha
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) honey

Cooking Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F (205°C).
  2. Toast the walnuts in the oven for 4 to 6 minutes. Set aside.
  3. In a mixing bowl, coat the carrots with the grapeseed oil, salt, and black pepper.
  4. Season the yogurt with salt if it’s too thin. Strain it with a fine-mesh strainer, reserving the whey. Add the whey to the chimichurri for mild acidity.
  5. Combine the sriracha and honey, and pour half the mixture over the carrots, coating them evenly. Arrange the carrots in an ovenproof pan. Bake uncovered for 20 to 30 minutes (depending on thickness), until tender and browned.
  6. Remove the carrots from the oven and drizzle with the remaining sriracha and honey.
  7. To finish, spread the yogurt on a plate and arrange the carrots on top. Spoon the chimichurri over the carrots and sprinkle with the toasted walnuts.

The scrapsbook. IKEA. (n.d.). Retrieved October 18, 2022.

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #whywastewednesday, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

#whywastewednesday  #foodfindersinc  #foodrescue #stopfoodwaste #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Nutrition

Vegan French Toast

#MeatlessMonday

How to make the BEST Vegan French Toast! So easy to make in just 10 minutes, using everyday ingredients. You won’t miss the eggs at all in this delicious weekend morning breakfast. A secret ingredient makes these French toast incredibly crisp, thick and perfect!

How Can You Possibly Make French Toast Without Eggs?

The secret ingredient in this vegan French toast recipe is so common it’s probably in the pantry right now: Cornstarch. It’s perfect for getting that crisp exterior, and works like a charm as the bread cooks in the pan.

Without eggs, your batter for vegan French toast includes these ingredients: Soy milk (or any other non-dairy milk), cornstarch, ground flaxseeds (just a teaspoon, to help thicken the batter), 1/2 teaspoon baking powder, maple syrup, cinnamon and vanilla.

Prep: 5 mins

Cook: 5 mins

Total: 10 mins

Servings: 3 people

Ingredients

  • 1 cup unsweetened soy milk (or other non-dairy milk)
  • 1/4 cup cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon ground flaxseeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoons pure maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 6-8 slices thick sliced quality bread, such as ciabatta or French
  • 2-3 tablespoons vegan butter or coconut oil for frying
  • For serving: maple syrup, powdered sugar, or fresh fruit

Cooking Instructions

  1. In a shallow bowl, wide enough to hold a piece of bread, whisk together the soy milk, cornstarch, ground flaxseeds, baking powder, cinnamon, maple syrup and vanilla.
  2. Add a little bit of vegan butter/coconut oil to a pan over medium-high heat and melt. Whisk the batter again right before dipping bread, as the cornstarch will settle to the bottom of the bowl. 
  3. Dip each side of the bread in the batter and let soak for about 10 seconds, then add the bread to the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes on each side, until golden brown. Add more vegan butter/oil to the pan as needed in between pieces of bread. 
  4. Serve with maple syrup, powdered sugar and fresh fruit, if desired.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 404kcal | Carbohydrates: 69g | Protein: 12g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Sodium: 648mg | Potassium: 165mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 524IU | Calcium: 141mg | Iron: 1mg

Nora. (2021, August 9). Vegan French toast. Nora Cooks. Retrieved November 8, 2022.

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Food Waste

Tips and Ideas for using those Thanksgiving Scraps and Leftovers

#WhyWasteWednesday

#WhyWasteFood Wednesday is a call to action to take those almost-in-the-trash food items and turn them into delicious meals!

At least 1.3 billion tons of food is lost or wasted every year around the world—in fields, during transport, in storage, at restaurants, and in our homes! If each individual made a call to action to stop their own food waste–the planet benefits, we have less hunger, and your own grocery bills will go down through the savings.

UN Food & Agricultural

Scraps: seeds, butternut squash peels, apple peels, vegetable fat, turkey carcass, giblets, pie crust

Ideas for Leftovers

Thanksgiving leftovers are a huge part of the holiday. A celebration of harvest, many spend time with family, and indulge in large spreads of savory and sweet dishes. Read about ways to reduce your Thanksgiving food waste here: http://foodfinders.org/2022/11/16/tips-for-reducing-your-food-waste-this-thanksgiving/. Even with steps to be mindful and take action against food waste, leftovers on Thanksgiving are unavoidable, and often sought after. Here are a few quick tips to make something new out of your holiday scraps and leftovers:

  • Use seeds and butternut squash peels as a crispy garnish for any soup or salad
  • Use apple peels with cinnamon, sugar, and lemon juice for baked crisps
  • Any scraps can be used for vegetable broth (freeze scraps for future broth, or make and then freeze broth)
  • Rendered or strained fat can be refrigerated and saved for roasting vegetables or sautéing ingredients for hash made with other leftovers
  • Simmer turkey carcass with some aromatics for an outstanding soup stock 
  • Giblets included with our turkey can be used as part of dressing or gravy 
  • Leftover pie crusts can be brushed with butter, sprinkled with cinnamon sugar, twisted into any shape and baked for a quick, sweet treat

Check out all these and more in Food editor Joe Yonan’s piece on root-to-leaf and seed-to-stem cooking with fruits and vegetables.


Yonan, J. (2021, April 23). Perspective | cut waste and boost flavor with skin-to-seed recipes that use the whole vegetable. The Washington Post. Retrieved November 14, 2022.

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #whywastewednesday, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

#whywastewednesday  #foodfindersinc  #foodrescue #stopfoodwaste #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Climate

Tips for Reducing Your Food Waste This Thanksgiving

#WhyWasteFoodWednesday

#WhyWasteFoodWednesday is a call to action to take those almost-in-the-trash food items and turn them into delicious meals!

At least 1.3 billion tons of food is lost or wasted every year around the world—in fields, during transport, in storage, at restaurants, and in our homes! If each individual made a call to action to stop their own food waste–the planet benefits, we have less hunger, and your own grocery bills will go down through the savings.

UN Food & Agricultural

How to Reduce Food Waste at Thanksgiving Dinner

Food waste is a year-round concern, and the large Thanksgiving meal can present a challenge. You’re buying many more ingredients, and you’re making large-scale recipes with lots of potential leftovers. You may be preoccupied with the business of the holiday season, so keeping your food waste in mind can become a small concern. But there are easy ways to reduce food waste and, therefore your environmental impact, even around the holidays. Here are a few tips geared toward Thanksgiving dinner.

Plan How Much Food to Make

Until you know how many people you’re cooking for, you’ll be unable to plan portions accurately. Press for answers and get people to commit. Not only will this ensure you’re not overcooking, it will also benefit party planning in general.

Make an Entire Thanksgiving with Fewer Ingredients 

The variety of dishes is a key part of Thanksgiving dinners. Part of the problem is that it can mean separate lists of ingredients for every recipe. But it’s ok if there’s some overlap between your courses; it’s smart, thrifty, and eco-friendly, because it means less packaging and less of a chance that you’re going to have lots of half-used bottles and cans hanging around your fridge or pantry waiting to go bad. Even better, synchronizing ingredients and flavors can make your meal seem like a well-thought-out package and make you look like a genius menu planner. 

Use Every Ingredient Wisely

After you’ve shopped and before you reach the leftovers phase, there are ways to make smart use of the extra bits of various ingredients. A great read is a piece by Food editor Joe Yonan’s; “root-to-leaf and seed-to-stem cooking.” He shows you how to use the more expected seeds and the less expected peels of butternut squash for a crispy garnish that would work on any soup or salad. When you have peels left from an apple pie, toss them with cinnamon, sugar, and lemon juice and then bake them to make crisps. At the very least, hang on to scraps for vegetable broth. Freeze the scraps, or make the broth and then freeze that.

The same line of thought applies to whatever meat you may be serving, as well. Rendered or strained fat can be refrigerated and saved for roasting vegetables or sautéing ingredients for hash made from leftovers. Get the most out of your turkey carcass by simmering them with some aromatics for an outstanding stock to be used in future soups. Giblets included with your turkey can become part of the dressing or gravy. Extra pie crust or crust trimmings can be brushed in butter, sprinkled with cinnamon sugar, twisted into any shape you want and baked for a quick sweet treat.

How to Use and Store Leftovers

Even if you’ve calculated the exact amount for the number of people at your Thanksgiving, you’re probably going to end up with at least some leftovers. And, to many, leftovers are an important part of Thanksgiving.

To prepare, have lots of containers for packing up food on hand. Your usual glass or plastic hard-sided options are perfect. If you’re planning to send guests home with food, consider asking them to bring their own storage containers. That way, no one is scrambling when it comes time to pack up.

And be mindful of how long food is put out for. Perishable food, including turkey and many sides, can be left at room temperature for 2 hours. Even less is better, so as soon as everyone is done eating, start cleaning up, as much of a drag as it can be. Eat your refrigerated leftovers within four days. If you need to buy yourself more time, go ahead and freeze them before the four days are out, though ideally sooner for the best quality. Hand out leftovers to guests when they leave.


Krystal, B. (2022, November 10). Advice | how to reduce food waste at Thanksgiving dinner. The Washington Post. Retrieved November 14, 2022.

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #whywastewednesday, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

#whywastewednesday  #foodfindersinc  #foodrescue #stopfoodwaste #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Climate

The Best Thanksgiving Cranberry Sauce

#MeatlessMonday

Look no further for the Best Ever Cranberry Sauce! This easy and delightful recipe takes only 15 minutes to make and a handful of ingredients! Spiced with cinnamon and sweetened with orange juice, it is the best combination of sweet and tart! The perfect complement to your holiday meal! 

One Thanksgiving recipe that often seems to be overlooked is the cranberry sauce. So many people go for the canned stuff, and while it’s great in a pinch, it doesn’t even come close to homemade.

Cranberry Sauce for the Holidays

Cranberry sauce is an essential part of every holiday meal for one simple reason – it cuts through the heaviness of all the other dishes. It’s light, it’s bright, and it’s actually pretty darn healthy. Adding orange and cinnamon to cranberry sauce really gives it more depth of flavor and sweetens it just slightly. It’s still lovely and tart, but not quite so tart that you’ll be puckering your lips.

Can I Make This in Advance

You betcha! In fact, this is a great make-ahead recipe. It’s served chilled so you need to make it at least one day in advance anyways. The flavor is even better after two or three days so if you have time beforehand, consider just getting this recipe out of the way at the beginning of the week. Another note: you might want to double the recipe for plenty of leftovers!

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup sugar
  • ½ cup orange juice
  • ½ cup water
  • 12 oz fresh cranberries rinsed and picked through
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 piece of orange peel just use a potato peel or paring knife

Cranberry sauce is the perfect way to cut through the heaviness of a Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner and it adds a gorgeous pop of color and flavor to every bite. I hope you give this super easy recipe a try this holiday season!

Cooking Instructions

  1. Combine sugar, orange juice, and water in a large saucepan over medium heat. Stir to combine.
  2. Add cranberries, salt, cinnamon stick and orange peel.
  3. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring frequently.
  4. Continue cooking, for about 10 minutes, or until all or most of the cranberries have popped. I like to leave a handful of berries whole.
  5. Let cool for at least 30 minutes. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.
  6. Can be made up to 3 days in advance.

Nutrition

Calories: 100kcal 

Carbohydrates: 25g

Sodium: 2mg

Potassium: 67mg

Fiber: 2g

Sugar: 21g

Vitamin A: 55IU

Vitamin C: 13.4mg

Calcium: 9mg

Iron: 0.2mg


Why Meatless Monday?

  • Meatless Monday is of utmost importance, especially in the United States, as we consume much more animal products than the rest of the world.
  • The meat industry uses vast amounts of our finite fossil fuels and water and lots of grain to feed livestock, which is extremely inefficient. Why not use those resources to feed people more directly?
  • About 1,850 gallons of water is needed to produce a singular pound of beef, comparable to only 39 gallons of water per pound of vegetables. A vegetarian diet alone could dramatically reduce water consumption by 58% per person!
  • Meat production also is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, which has proven to correlate to the climate change crisis. 
  • Some benefits of eating plant-based once a week include:
    • Save 133 gallons of water with each meatless meal!
    • Reduce your carbon footprint by 8 pounds each Meatless Monday you participate in
    • If you commit to participating in Meatless Monday every Monday, that is equivalent to skipping one serving of beef for a year, would save the same amount of emissions as driving 348 miles in a car.

***

Timeout, T.- M. O. (2019, November 12). The best cranberry sauce: Ready in 15 minutes! Mom On Timeout. Retrieved November 14, 2022.

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #meatlessmondays, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate #meatlessmonday #foodfindersinc  #FoodRescue #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Climate

Creamy Goat Cheese Polenta with Ratatouille

#MeatlessMondays

Classic French ratatouille sounds fancy, but is actually a simple, lovely way of cooking vegetables that are all in season at the same time together in a single plan. Ratatouille together with creamy polenta make a dinner that’s at once hearty and warming, fresh and oh-so-flavorful.

“Ratatouille—a classic combination of late summer vegetables, cooked to tender perfection—is an ideal partner for creamy goat cheese polenta. Together, they’re the vegetarian dinner of your dreams!”

The Modern Proper

Serves: 6 minutes

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Calories: 513

Ratatouille

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove, halved
  • 1 small globe eggplant, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • 1 medium zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • 1 medium yellow squash, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • 1 yellow, red, or orange bell pepper cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • 4 Roma tomatoes, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • 1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher sea salt
  • Freshly cracked black pepper
  • 5 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves removed

Polenta

Ingredients

  • 6 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 2 cups whole milk, plus more as needed
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 1 1/2 cups stone-ground polenta or yellow cornmeal
  • 8 ounces goat cheese
  • 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts
  • 10 to 12 fresh basil leaves, minced

Cooking Instructions

  1. Make the ratatouille. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Grease an 8 x 8-inch baking dish with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and rub the cut sides of the garlic clove all over the bottom and sides. Discard the garlic clove.
  2. On a clean work surface, spread out the eggplant, zucchini, squash, bell pepper, tomato, and onion. Drizzle them with the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil and sprinkle with the garlic powder, salt, and black pepper to taste. Toss to coat well.
  3. Transfer the veggies to the prepared baking dish.. Scatter on the thyme leaves.
  4. Cover. and bake for 20 minutes, then uncover and continue baking until the vegetables are tender, about 25 more minutes.
  5. Meanwhile, make the polenta. In a medium pan, combine the stock, milk, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to medium and slowly whisk in the polenta.
  6. Cook, stirring often, until the polenta begins to pull away from the sides of the pan, about 30 minutes.
  7. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in 6 ounces of the goat cheese. If you’d like the polenta a bit thinner, stir in a bit more milk.
  8. To serve, divide the polenta evenly among six bowls and spoon on a generous serving of the ratatouille. Top with additional goat cheese, toasted pine nuts, and basil. Serve immediately.

Nutrition

  • Protein: 18g
  • Carbohydrates: 56g
  • Total Fat: 25g
  • Dietary Fiber: 8g
  • Cholesterol: 45mg
  • Sodium: 1213mg
  • Total Sugars: 12g

Why Meatless Monday?

  • Meatless Monday is of utmost importance, especially in the United States, as we consume much more animal products than the rest of the world.
  • The meat industry uses vast amounts of our finite fossil fuels and water and lots of grain to feed livestock, which is extremely inefficient. Why not use those resources to feed people more directly?
  • About 1,850 gallons of water is needed to produce a singular pound of beef, comparable to only 39 gallons of water per pound of vegetables. A vegetarian diet alone could dramatically reduce water consumption by 58% per person!
  • Meat production also is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, which has proven to correlate to the climate change crisis. 
  • Some benefits of eating plant-based once a week include:
    • Save 133 gallons of water with each meatless meal!
    • Reduce your carbon footprint by 8 pounds each Meatless Monday you participate in
    • If you commit to participating in Meatless Monday every Monday, that is equivalent to skipping one serving of beef for a year, would save the same amount of emissions as driving 348 miles in a car.

***

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #meatlessmondays, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

Creamy goat cheese polenta with ratatouille. The Modern Proper. (n.d.). Retrieved November 1, 2022.

#meatlessmonday #foodfindersinc  #FoodRescue #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Climate

Corn Husk Smocked Chicken

#WhyWasteFoodWednesday

#WhyWasteFood Wednesday is a call to action to take those almost-in-the-trash food items and turn them into delicious meals!

At least 1.3 billion tons of food is lost or wasted every year around the world—in fields, during transport, in storage, at restaurants, and in our homes! If each individual made a call to action to stop their own food waste–the planet benefits, we have less hunger, and your own grocery bills will go down through the savings.

UN Food & Agriculture

Scraps: Corn Cobs, Corn Husks, Corn Silks

Corn Husk Smoked Chicken

Corn is delicious, but creates more waste than what ends up on the plate. That’s the inspiration behind this dish. This is a delicious dinner that uses all the parts that typically end up in the compost. 

Creamy Polenta

Ingredients

  • 5 corn cobs
  • 1½ tsp (9g) kosher salt
  • ⅓ cup (90g) coarse ground cornmeal 
  • 2 tbsp (30g) freshly grated Grana Padano or Parmigiano-Reggiano 
  • 1 tbsp (14g) unsalted butter

Directions

  1. In a heavy-based saucepan, combine the corn cobs with enough water to cover them. Heat over medium-high heat just until it begins to boil. Reduce the heat to medium low and simmer for 1 hour, covered. 
  2. Strain and discard the corn cobs. Return the corn stock to the stove and simmer over medium-high heat. Add the kosher salt. Add the cornmeal and whisk the mixture as it comes to a boil. Continue whisking for an additional 3 minutes. 3 4 
  3. Reduce the heat to very low, cover the pan, and cook the polenta, stirring every  5 minutes or so (switch to a wooden spoon from this point forward), until the cornmeal is completely cooked and quite tender,  2½ to 3½ hours. It may seem too thin initially, but it will gradually thicken.  As the polenta cooks, a skin will form on the bottom and sides of the pan (if you are not using a non-stick pan), which is proper and gives the polenta a slightly toasty flavor. 
  4. Fold in the cheese and butter until fully incorporated.

Corn Silk

Ingredients 

  • 2 cobs of corn worth of corn silk 
  • 4 cups (1 L) canola oil 
  • ½ tsp (3 g) kosher salt 
  • ¼ tsp (1 g) smoked paprika

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 165F(75C)
  2. discard any dark brown/black silk. Transfer the remaining silk to a parchment lined baking sheet and dehydrate in the oven overnight. 
  3. Fill a heavy-bottomed pot with oil and bring to 400°F (205°C) over medium heat and fry the silk for 15 seconds, or until crispy and golden. 
  4. Transfer to a paper towel to drain, and season with kosher salt and smoked paprika.

Chicken

Ingredients

  • 2 whole corn husks 
  • 2 boneless chicken breasts, skin on 
  • 2 tbsp (30 ml) canola oil 
  • 1½ tsp (9 g) kosher salt 
  • 2 tsp (2 g) rosemary, finely chopped 
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely minced 
  • 1 cup (125 g) chanterelle mushrooms, cleaned and torn

Directions

  1. Submerge the corn husks in cold water and soak for 1 hour. 
  2. Preheat the oven to 325°F (163°C). 
  3. In a mixing bowl, combine the chicken with 1 tbsp (15 ml) of the canola oil, 1 tsp (3 g)  of kosher salt, 1 tsp (1 g) of rosemary, and 2 cloves of garlic. 
  4. Drain the corn husks and place in an ovenproof pan. Warm the husks over medium-high heat until they begin  to smoke. immediately transfer to the bottom of the oven. 
  5. In a different ovenproof pan, warm the remaining canola oil over medium-high heat until it shimmers and runs easily across the pan. Add the chicken breasts, skin side down, and cook until the skin turns a medium golden brown. Flip the chicken breasts over and transfer to the oven. Be sure to turn on your hood fan as the smoke from the corn husks will billow from the oven and potentially irritate your eyes. roast for 15 to 20 minutes, until the chicken is cooked completely. 
  6. Transfer the chicken to a plate to rest. return the pan to the stovetop over medium-high heat and add the chanterelle mushrooms. Once they begin to sizzle in the rendered chicken fat and juices, add the remaining rosemary and garlic. Cook for another minute and remove the pan from heat.

Plating

Place half the polenta in the center of a plate and garnish with mushroom-rosemary-garlic mixture. Top with 1 chicken breast and finish with a nest of silk. Repeat with the remaining polenta and chicken breast.


If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #whywastewednesday, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

#whywastewednesday  #foodfindersinc  #foodrescue #stopfoodwaste #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Climate

Flotsam Filo Pie

#WhyWasteWednesday

#WhyWasteFood Wednesday is a call to action to take those almost-in-the-trash food items and turn them into delicious meals!

At least 1.3 billion tons of food is lost or wasted every year around the world—in fields, during transport, in storage, at restaurants, and in our homes! If each individual made a call to action to stop their own food waste–the planet benefits, we have less hunger, and your own grocery bills will go down through the savings.

UN Food & Agriculture

Scraps: leftover meat or fish, leftover vegetables, leftover herb stems

Serves: 6

Prep: 40-45 minutes

Cook: 35-40 minutes

Vardagen: Baking Pan

Flotsam Filo Pie

Filo pie is known as börek in Turkish. It’s a quintessential dish you can eat almost every day, with there being countless varieties that offer different shapes and fillings that will satisfy every taste. This recipe is perfect to change and make the best use of leftover food and still enjoy a tasty, pleasant meal. Serve it with tomato cucumber salad in summer and with mixed salad greens in winter.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (150 g) leftover cooked protein such as fish, beef, lamb
  • 1 cup (90 g) leftover vegetable bits (raw or cooked); can be a mixture, finely chopped
  • 1 cup (200 g) leftover herb stems such as parsley, dill, cilantro, tarragon, chives, or chervil, finely chopped
  • Salt to taste
  • Black pepper to taste
  • 1 cup (250 ml) milk
  • ½ cup (125 ml) vegetable oil
  • 1 package filo sheets
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tbsp (9 g) nigella, sesame, caraway, or fennel seeds (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Mix all chopped ingredients, and depending on their original seasoning, add the salt and black pepper.
  3. Combine the milk and vegetable oil in a small bowl.
  4. Lay the filo sheets on the kitchen counter or a table and cover them with a slightly damp cloth to prevent them from drying and cracking.
  5. Use 2 filo sheets per pie, brushing them with the milk and oil mixture. Spread 2 to 3 tbsp (30 to 45 ml) of filling on 1 long edge, about 1-inch (2½ cm) thick. Roll the filled portion of the sheet loosely to the other end, and then swirl it to create a snail shape. Repeat until all of the filling has been used.
  6. Place them on the parchment-lined baking sheet.
  7. In a small bowl, beat the egg yolk with a ½ tsp (2 ml) of water. Brush the mixture onto each pie and sprinkle them with the seeds.
  8. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes, and enjoy!

Note

Nigella and sesame seeds pair with any filling, while caraway seeds pair well with a meat filling. Fennel seeds complement any fish or seafood filling.


If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #whywastewednesday, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

#whywastewednesday  #foodfindersinc  #foodrescue #stopfoodwaste #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Nutrition

Vegan Walnut and Lentil Bolgnese

#MeatlessMondays

A store-bought jar of marinara is such a beautiful thing—it’s a shortcut that doesn’t short. Tomatoes are an ideal food for preserving and jarred marinara sauce is no exception—loaded with wonderful, slow cooked tomatoes and herbs, it’s a time-saver that really delivers. And in this case, it pairs up with lentils and walnuts to make a flavorful, rich vegan bolognese sauce that packs a huge nutritional punch, too! Healthy, hearty, vegan, rich, quick, easy, yummy—this walnut and lentil bolognese is an update on childhood favorite and a weeknight superstar.

“Boldly flavored, super hearty and incredibly easy, this vegan walnut and lentil bolognese recipe takes your plant-based eating goals to new heights.”

How to Buy and Store Walnuts

  • Buy them in sealed packaging. This will ensure that they’re as fresh as possible when you first get them.
  • Store them in the fridge or freezer. Once you’ve opened the package—or if you’ve bought walnuts from the bulk section—store the walnuts in the fridge. Or, if you want to store them for more than a month or so, store them in the freezer.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup grated carrots
  • 1 cup minced celery
  • 1 cup finely minced yellow onion
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 cup raw walnuts, finely chopped
  • 1 cup dried brown or green lentils, rinsed
  • 4 cups vegetable stock or broth
  • 1 (24-ounce) jar marinara sauce
  • 1 cup red wine, such as Pinot Noir
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 2 teaspoons Italian seasoning
  • 2 teaspoons freshly cracked black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste
  • 1 pound cooked pappardelle or tagliatelle, for serving
  • Freshly grated Parmesan cheese or vegan Parmesan cheese, for serving (optional)

Cooking Instructions

  1. Heat the oil in a large saucepan or braiser over medium heat. Once the oil is glistening, add the carrots, celery, and onions and cook until softened, about 6 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute more.
  2. Add the walnuts and lentils, stir to combine. Add the stock, marinara, wine, garlic powder, Italian seasoning, pepper, and salt. Stir to combine again, then increase the heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally, until the sauce thickens and the lentils are cooked to your liking, about 35 minutes.
  3. Transfer 2 cups of the sauce to a blender or food processor and blend until mostly smooth. Return the blended sauce back to the pan and stir to combine. Taste and add more salt as needed.
  4. Serve the bolognese over your favorite pasta, topped with Parmesan if desired.

Nutrition

  • Calories 320
  • Protein 10g
  • Carbohydrates 23g
  • Total Fat 19g
  • Dietary Fiber 7g
  • Cholesterol 0mg
  • Sodium 344mg
  • Total Sugars 7g

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #meatlessmondays, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

#meatlessmonday #foodfindersinc  #FoodRescue #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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MAc & Rinds from above on white marble tableFood Waste

Mac & Rinds

#WhyWasteFood Wednesday is a call to action to take those almost-in-the-trash food items and turn them into delicious meals!

At least 1.3 billion tons of food is lost or wasted every year around the world—in fields, during transport, in storage, at restaurants, and in our homes! If each individual made a call to action to stop their own food waste–the planet benefits, we have less hunger, and your own grocery bills will go down through the savings.

UN Food & Agricultural

Scraps: Cheese Rinds, Stale Bread

Enjoying a selection of cheese is always a treat, but often leaves leftovers with no set purpose. With such offerings, let’s make a béchamel with all those ends. Rich and delicious, it’s sure to be enjoyed!

Ingredients

  • 2 cups (500 ml) milk
  • 1 cup (225 g) cheese trimmings
  • ¼ cup (56 g) butter
  • ½ cup (65 g) flour
  • Salt to taste
  • 1¾ cups (250 g) macaroni
  • ½ cup (120 g) cheddar or mozzarella
  • ¼ cup (30 g) bread crumbs
  • ¼ cup (60 g) parmesan cheese, grated (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F (205°C).
  2. Gently simmer the milk over medium heat with the cheese trimmings in a medium-sized pot for about 15 minutes. Stir frequently to prevent the mixture from sticking to the bottom of the pot and burning. Strain and set aside.
  3. In a separate medium-sized pot, melt the butter and add the flour.
  4. Cook on low heat until the butter and flour comes together. Continue to cook for another 5 to 10 minutes until the raw flour taste disappears.
  5. Slowly drizzle the infused milk and cheese mixture into the flour, whisking continuously to prevent lumps from forming. Simmer gently until the mixture comes together and looks smooth. Season with salt.
  6. While the sauce is simmering, bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add the macaroni, reduce heat, and gently boil until al dente, according to package directions.
  7. Drain the macaroni, add to the sauce, and stir. Once the macaroni is well coated, transfer to an ovenproof dish.
  8. Evenly sprinkle with cheddar or mozzarella, followed by the bread crumbs and Parmesan, if using.
  9. Bake in the oven for 15 to 20 minutes until golden brown.

Notes

I like to use Parmesan rinds, ends of brie, or any soft cheese. The stronger the cheese flavor, the stronger the sauce flavor. Avoid blue cheese and goat cheese if you don’t like the strong aroma.

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #whywastewednesday, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

#whywastewednesday  #foodfindersinc  #foodrescue #stopfoodwaste #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

The scrapsbook. IKEA. (n.d.). Retrieved October 18, 2022.

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Vegan Potato Soup

#WhyWasteWednesday

Thick, hearty and creamy Vegan Potato Soup. It’s really simple to make and very budget-friendly. You can enjoy it just as it is, or get crazy with toppings. I like to finish mine off with some crumbled tempeh bacon, crispy roasted potato chunks & a sprinkle of parsley for a pop of color!

Who’s up for a bowl of the best comforting, creamy, vegan potato soup?

If so you are in the right place! Soothing, Comforting, Full of veggies, Low in fat, and low budget, this soup is the perfect meal for any group!

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Serves: 6

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons vegan butter , or olive oil, or to make oil-free omit and use a few tablespoons of water for sautéing instead
  • 2 medium onions , chopped finely
  • 2 ribs celery , diced
  • 2 large carrots , diced
  • 4 cloves garlic , chopped finely
  • 2 teaspoons salt , plus more to taste
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper , plus more to taste
  • 4 tablespoons all purpose flour , or gluten-free all purpose flour
  • 2 cups / 480 mls non dairy milk , cashew milk or soy milk are my milks of choice for savory recipes but any other unsweetened creamy non-dairy milk will work too
  • 2½ – 3 cups / 600 – 720 mls flavourful vegetable broth/stock , divided
  • 5 medium / about 700 g potatoes , cut into ½ inch cubes
  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg , (optional)
  • 1 bay leaf

Cooking Instructions

  1. To a large saucepan, add the vegan butter/oil and warm over a medium heat before adding the onions, celery and carrots. Cook, stirring constantly, until the onions are just starting to get a little color, then add the garlic and cook for another 2 minutes. 
  2. Add the salt and pepper, then the flour to the pan and stir it all around for about a minute to cook the raw flour taste out, then slowly add the soy milk, stirring as you go to work out any lumps. Then add the vegetable broth (reserving about ½ a cup / 120 mls) , chopped potatoes, nutmeg and the bay leaf. 
  3. Stir really well then let it simmer for about 30 minutes, or until the potatoes are soft and just starting to break down. Add all of, or some of, the reserved ½ a cup / 120 mls of broth if you prefer a thinner consistency. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. 
  4. Serve as it is, or with toppings. See the post above for ideas.

Notes

It is normal for the soup to thicken as it cools. Soup reheats really well. Thin with more broth or water if it becomes a little thick. 

Nutrition

Serving: 1of 6 servings

Calories: 107kcal

Carbohydrates: 13gProtein: 4gFat: 5gSaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 1264mgPotassium: 269mgFiber: 2gSugar: 4gVitamin A: 4627IUVitamin C: 5mgCalcium: 125mgIron: 1mg


If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #meatlessmondays, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate#meatlessmonday #foodfindersinc  #FoodRescue #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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Food Waste

No Waste Carrot Gnudi

#WhyWasteWednesday

#WhyWasteFood Wednesday is a call to action to take those almost-in-the-trash food items and turn them into delicious meals!

At least 1.3 billion tons of food is lost or wasted every year around the world—in fields, during transport, in storage, at restaurants, and in our homes! If each individual made a call to action to stop their own food waste–the planet benefits, we have less hunger, and your own grocery bills will go down through the savings.

UN Food & Agricultural

A great way to reduce your food waste is trying as often as you can to cook meals using as many parts of the ingredients as possible. This Gnudi is a perfect example, making use of the entire carrot. Gnudi are gnocchi-like dumplings made with ricotta cheese instead of potato, with semolina. Pillow-y and lighter than gnocchi, this fresh Carrot Gnudi, as a delicious way to reduce your food waste. 

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch baby (Dutch) carrots, trimmed, leaves reserved
  • 500g carrots, cut into 2cm pieces
  • 1/3 cup (80ml) extra virgin olive oil
  • 60g unsalted butter
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 250g fresh ricotta
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup (40g) finely grated parmesan, plus extra to serve
  • 2 heaped tbsp plain flour, plus extra to dust
  • Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon, plus lemon wedges to serve

Cooking Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Wash carrot leaves and set aside. Place chopped carrots and baby carrots on 2 baking trays and drizzle each tray with 2 tbsp oil. Season, then roast for 40-50 minutes until tender and lightly caramelized. Set the carrots aside to cool.
  2. Melt 20g butter in a frypan over medium-low heat. Add onion and garlic, and cook, stirring, for 5-6 minutes until soft. Transfer to a food processor with chopped carrots (don’t use baby carrots) and whiz until almost smooth.
  3. Transfer to a bowl with ricotta, egg, parmesan and flour, and stir to combine. Season. Using two dessert spoons, shape spoonful’s of mixture into ovals and place on a baking paper-lined baking tray dusted with extra flour. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil over high heat.
  4. In 3 batches, cook gnudi for 2-3 minutes until they float. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on a paper towel.
  5. Melt remaining 40g butter in a pan over medium-high heat. Cook gnudi, turning gently, for 3-4 minutes until golden. Remove and keep warm.
  6. Add baby carrots, leaves and lemon juice and zest to the pan. Season. Cook, tossing, for 2-3 minutes until wilted and warmed through.
  7. Serve gnudi with baby carrots, leaves, extra parmesan and lemon wedges.

If you have a recipe you would like to share with us for #whywastewednesday, please email christian.bearden100@gmail.com.

If you would like to make an impact on reducing food waste and hunger help us grow our food rescue operations: Donate

#whywastewednesday #foodfindersinc  #foodrescue #stopfoodwaste #reducehunger #improvenutrition #helpfoodinsecurecommunities #HelpEndHunger #Volunteer #Charity #fightinghunger #rescuingfood #Donate #makeanimpact

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